3
Challenging Tradition
The Dialectica

The Dialectica, dedicated to the education of the sons of his brother Dagobert, was Peter Abelard's first large-scale composition. Its five constituent treatises, each dealing with one aspect or another of language and argument, must have taken many years to write.1 We cannot be sure whether certain passages—such as his response to accusations that a Christian should not deal with matters pertaining to faith, which appears within a prologue to the fourth treatise—were added at a later date, after he became a monk at St.-Denis in 1117/18. The frequent criticisms that he makes of William of Champeaux in the first two treatises, coupled with examples such as Petrum diligit sua puella (“His girl loves Peter”) as the converse of Petrus diligit suam puellam (“Peter loves his girl”) offered in the third treatise, suggest that a date between 1112 and 1117/18 is more likely for a composition that established Abelard as the most important dialectician of his day.2

In structure, Abelard's Dialectica is closer to the Dialectica of Gerland of Besançon than to the Introductiones dialecticae of William of Champeaux, and may have been modeled on the lost Dialectica of Roscelin. The first treatise, “The Book of Parts” (unfortunately missing its opening in the single surviving manuscript), deals with antepraedicamenta, or the predicables discussed by Porphyry; the categories of Aristotle; and post predicamenta, or other signifying words. The second treatise deals with categorical statements and syllogisms; the third with the topics, or the different types of argument; the fourth with hypothetical statements and

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Abelard and Heloise
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Great Medieval Thinkers ii
  • Abelard and Heloise iii
  • Series Foreword v
  • Contents xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • 1: Images of Abelard and Heloise 7
  • 2: The Early Years Roscelin of Compiègne and William of Champeaux 21
  • 3: Challenging Tradition the Dialectica 43
  • 4: Heloise and Discussion About Love 58
  • 5: Returning to Logica 81
  • 6: The Trinity 101
  • 7: A Christian Theologia 123
  • 8: Heloise and the Paraclete 145
  • 9: Ethics, Sin, and Redemption 174
  • 10: Faith, Sacraments, and Charity 204
  • 11: Accusations of Heresy 226
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 308

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.