Reshaping National Intelligence for an Age of Information

By Gregory F. Treverton | Go to book overview

RAND Studies in Policy Analysis

Editor: Charles Wolf, Jr., Senior Economic Advisor and Corporate Fellow in International Economics, RAND

Policy analysis is the application of scientific methods to develop and test test alternative ways of addressing social, economic, legal, international, national security, and other problems. The RAND Studies in Policy Analysis series aims to include several significant, timely, and innovative works each year in this broad field. Selection is guided by an editorial board consisting of Charles Wolf, Jr. (editor) and David S. C. Chu, Paul K. Davis, and Lynn Karoly (associate editors).

Also in the series:

David C. Gompert and F. Stephen Larrabee (eds.), America and Europe: A Partnership for a New Era

John W. Peabody, M. Omar Rahman, Paul J. Gertler, Joyce Mann, Donna O. Farley, Jeff Luck, David Robalino, and Grace M. Carter, Policy and Health: Implications for Development in Asia

Samantha F. Ravich, Marketization and Democracy: East Asian Experiences

Robert J. MacCoun and Peter Reuter, Drug War Heresies: Learning from Other Vices, Times, and Places

Daniel L. Byman and Matthew Waxman, The Dynamics of Coercion: American Foreign Policy and the Limits of Military Might

James A. Dewar, Assumption-Based Planning: A Tool for Reducing Avoidale Surprises

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Reshaping National Intelligence for an Age of Information
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Reshaping National Intelligence for an Age of Information i
  • Rand Studies in Policy Analysis iii
  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Note on Sources xvii
  • 1: The Imperative of Reshaping 1
  • 2: The World of Intelligence Beyond 2010 20
  • 3: The Militarization of Intelligence 62
  • 4: Designated Readers: the Open Source Revolution 93
  • 5: Spying, Looking, and Catching Criminals 136
  • 6: The Intelligence of Policy 177
  • 7: A Reshaped Intelligence 216
  • Index 257
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