War Crimes: Confronting Atrocity in the Modern World

By David Chuter | Go to book overview

10
The Future: Never Again?

No reasonable human being, if given the chance, would oppose the idea of trying to prevent large-scale violations of human rights in the future, and most people would agree that it is worth spending time, money, and effort to try to bring this about. When we consider the resources that will be put into this general objective—from full-scale courts to relatively minor truth processes—we can agree that the objective seems to be a priority for the international community.

At first sight, it may seem curious that this is so—not in absolute terms (since good is always worth doing) but in relative terms. After all, the vast majority of avoidable suffering in the world in recent times does not come from violations of international humanitarian law, or even from violence. As has been the case for decades, the largest killers, especially of children and the weak, are hunger, malnutrition, exposure to the elements, and preventable diseases caused by the absence of cheap medicines and clean drinking water. Moreover, while the link between courts/truth commissions and the prevention of further atrocities is tenuous, the major plagues that afflict humanity are easy to tackle in principle. After all, there is no lack of food or cheap medicines in the world (they are just in the wrong places), and clean supplies of drinking water can be provided easily. Yet while programs to alleviate all of these evils do exist, the world seems curiously reluctant to display the kind of determined attitude actually required, or to give them the political visibility—through UN Security Council resolutions, for example—that would ensure that governments spent as much time and attention on them as they do, for example, on Balkan politics. And so I have been harangued a number of times by Africans demanding to know why the West does not take more seriously the situation in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, where the death toll since 1998 is

-255-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
War Crimes: Confronting Atrocity in the Modern World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • War Crimes - Confronting Atrocity in the Modern World iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • War Crimes xi
  • Introduction: A Grave in the Air 1
  • 1: The Basics 5
  • 2: The Origins 29
  • 3: The Law 59
  • 4: The Politics 93
  • 5: The Organization 131
  • 6: The Investigation 149
  • 7: The Arrest 187
  • 8: The Trial 203
  • 9: The Truth? 225
  • 10: The Future: Never Again? 255
  • Bibliography 281
  • Index 287
  • About the Book 299
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 300

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.