International Handbook of Social Anxiety: Concepts, Research, and Interventions Relating to the Self and Shyness

By W. Ray Crozier; Lynn E. Alden | Go to book overview

Preface

The International Handbook of Social Anxiety comprises a set of chapters specially written by distinguished researchers to give an account of what each regards as important in his or her specialist area. It aims to provide an account of the “state of the art” in the field of social anxiety. There is growing recognition among psychologists that problems of extreme shyness and social phobia are prevalent in the population, and recent years have seen a surge of research into these issues. The structure of the Handbook recognizes that social anxiety is a broad field encompassing the study of child development, the physiology of anxiety, the social psychology of shyness and interpersonal relationships, and clinical approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of social phobia. Chapters provide critical, yet accessible reviews of what they take to be the key issues and practices in their fields. They also include novel ideas and original syntheses of research where these promise to be seminal in the field. The volume is organized into three sections, concentrating respectively on the origins and development of social anxiety, its implications for social encounters and interpersonal relationships, and clinical interventions designed to reduce anxiety and enhance social functioning.

We are grateful to Mike Coombs at Wiley for his advice at every stage in the development of the Handbook and to Jonathan Cheek for his help in the planning stages. Ray Crozier thanks Sandra, John, and Beth Crozier for their support throughout the project and the Research Committee and School of Social Sciences at Cardiff University for granting a period of study leave to work on the book. Lynn Alden thanks Raymond and Sarah Andersen for their support throughout this project and Tanna Mellings and Andrew Ryder for their editorial assistance. We are grateful to John Crozier for help with the author index.

Table 13.1 in Chapter 13 is adapted from Miller, R. S. (2001) “Embarrassment and social phobia: Distant cousins or close kin?”, in S. G. Hofmann & P. M. DiBartolo (Eds.), From Social Anxiety to Social Phobia: Multiple Perspectives, with permission from Allyn & Bacon.

The diagnostic criteria for Avoidant Personality Disorder that are included in Chapter 15, Table 15.1, are reprinted with permission from the Diagnostic and

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