Blood and Justice: The Seventeenth-Century Parisian Doctor Who Made Blood Transfusion History

By Pete Moore | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
Precedence and prison

For Denis, the end of July 1667 had brought with it the warm glow of recognition. It was one thing to write up his work and publish it in his own pamphlets, as Denis had been doing over the summer, and to have some of them published in the new, but increasingly influential Journal des Sçavans, the editor of which was a personal friend. However, seeing his work translated into English and published in Oldenburg's Philosophical Transactions was the icing on the cake.

There it was, in Issue Number 27, page after page of his work and ideas, printed and distributed to all the centres of learning in Europe. This indeed was recognition. This would make his critics sit up and think. England was, after all, the place where circulation had been discovered. If they thought his work worthy of note, then who was to complain.

Unable to read English, Denis was prevented from analysing it fully to check that his ideas had survived translation, but even a casual scrutiny showed that many of the key features were there. For example, right at the beginning was the statement pointing out that Denis had been considering the possibilities of transfusion for 10 years since hearing it mentioned at a meeting at Montmor's academy. It was great to have this in writing, because now his precedence in this area was assured. When transfusion became widely used throughout the world, his name would be on everyone's lips and fortune should pour into his pockets.

The paper clearly mentioned his first transfusion into the youth and the second into the labourer. No one in the world had attempted anything so bold. Surely with this international recognition, the French Académie Royale des Sciences would now offer him a place within its esteemed membership? How could it refuse? All he needed

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Blood and Justice: The Seventeenth-Century Parisian Doctor Who Made Blood Transfusion History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Plates vii
  • Note on Sources viii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • 'Cast', and People Mentioned,In Order of Appearance x
  • Chapter One - A Vital Fluid 1
  • Chapter Two - Building on Harvey 17
  • Chapter Three - English Infusion 36
  • Chapter Four - Scientific Society 53
  • Chapter Five - English Transfusions 67
  • Chapter Six - Denis 'Route to the Top 91
  • Chapter Seven - Precedence and Prison 108
  • Chapter Eight - Playing Catch-Up 132
  • Chapter Nine - Mauroy Mystery 149
  • Chapter Ten - The Great Debate 161
  • Chapter Eleven - Mistake, Malice or Murder? 194
  • Notes 211
  • Timeline 214
  • Bibliography 219
  • Further Reading 224
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