Project Management Competence: Building Key Skills for Individuals, Teams, and Organizations

By J. Davidson Frame | Go to book overview

Chapter Twelve
Assessing Organizational
Competence
An obvious question that many readers may have at this point is, How do I determine how competent my organization is in the implementation of its projects? Given the absence of a wellestablished, systematic assessment methodology—such as the approaches taken by the ISO 9000, the Capability Maturity Model (CMM), the Deming Prize, or the Baldrige Award—organizations cannot simply turn to written guidelines or solicit insights from an expert who has carried out such assessments before. I suspect that the best organizations can do is adopt a fairly unstructured approach to the issue. If the competency assessment is an important part of a reengineering exercise, the organization may want to employ a full-blown external, internal, self-assessment (EISA) review. If it is simply a “sanity check,” then a small working group may be assembled to examine the organization's capabilities using a checklist approach.Whatever specific criteria are employed in the assessment, they should address the seven broad assessment questions discussed in this chapter:
1. Do we have clearly defined and well-established procedures in place for carrying out our project work?
2. Do we have information systems in place that will offer our project workers access to the information they need to do a good job?
3. Do we consistently acquire sufficient quantities of qualified human and material resources to carry out our project work?

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