Introducing Cognitive Analytic Therapy: Principles and Practice

By Anthony Ryle; Ian B. Kerr | Go to book overview

AFTERWORD

We set out in this book to offer a new introduction to the principles and practice of the evolving CAT model of psychotherapy. We hope that we have whetted the appetite of those who may wish to take their interest further and consider some form of training and that it will be useful as a guide to those currently undertaking a training. We also hope that it may usefully inform the professional practice and thinking of a wider readership. In this last chapter we recapitulate and consider its distinctive features, the reasons for its rapidly increasing popularity with both clinicians and patients, its research activities and emerging evidence base, and its implicit values.


DISTINCTIVE FEATURES OF CAT

The distinctive features of CAT emerged because it was constructed in a way which sought to include the common factors identified as helpful by Frank (1961) and it set out to integrate ideas and methods from other schools, notably psychoanalysis and cognitive psychology. As a result, many specific aspects of its practice are also to be found in the work of other therapists. What distinguishes CAT are its translations and transformations of these ideas and methods, its addition of some new practical and theoretical features, notably the introduction of Vygotskian understandings, and its seeking to develop a fully integrated model. The coherent and robust psychotherapy theory for which we aim should give an account of people and psychopathology which is compatible with research findings from studies of child development and of effective psychotherapies and from the broader fields of psychology, sociology

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