7 Steps to Fearless Speaking

By Lilyan Wilder | Go to book overview

STEP THREE
Establish a Dialogue

I have always believed that a lot of
the problems in the world would
disappear if people would start talk-
ing to each other instead of talking
about each other.

RONALD REGAN

All over the country, right now, thousands of people are standing up in boardrooms, facing PTA audiences, giving opening remarks at charity banquets, or making wedding toasts.

But, although thousands of people are giving public speeches, very few are communicating. Instead, they are reading aloud words they, or a speechwriter, put together on paper. These are serious, important pieces of information. And the audiences are dutifully playing their part—trying to listen, pretending to take notes, clapping politely at the finish.

Yet, once in a while, the scenario comes alive. It acquires a freshness, a sense of spontaneity. The speaker is totally engaging. He seems to be talking personally to everyone in the room! The audience finds real pleasure in the presentation and takes away something to think about, and even savor, for a long time.

What's the difference?

The speaker in the second scenario has engaged the audience by establishing a dialogue.

What, exactly, does this mean? Why is dialogue necessary? And how will it help you to become a fearless speaker? These are the questions I'll answer in this chapter.

-61-

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7 Steps to Fearless Speaking
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • More Praise for 7 Steps to Fearless Speaking *
  • Accolades Amd Affirmations from Students of Lilyan Wilder *
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • The Five Fears 9
  • Let's Get Started 21
  • Step One - Experience Your Voice 29
  • Step Two - Get a Response and Structure Your Thoughts 43
  • Step Three - Establish a Dialogue 61
  • Step Four - Tap Your Creativity 77
  • Step Five - Learn to Persuade 95
  • Step Six - Achieve Your Higher Objective 113
  • Step Seven - Give the Gift of Your Conviction 129
  • The Seven Steps in Action 151
  • Be a Fearless Speaker Every Day 191
  • Appendix A - Voice Work 197
  • Appendix B - If You Need Medical Help 213
  • Acknowledgments 217
  • Index 219
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