7 Steps to Fearless Speaking

By Lilyan Wilder | Go to book overview

Be a Fearless Speaker
Every Day

The problem that most people have at
work is that they're always playing a
role… Once that happens, you
become merely “pleasant.” But “pleas-
ant” isn't always very interesting. It
doesn't give people a compelling rea-
son to work on your projects or to be
on your team. If you can engage peo-
ple by expressing who you are, then
they'll be excited to work with you.

BARBARA MOSES

By the time you get to this chapter, if you've been working on the program, you have already made at least six presentations! Whether you have done your public speaking in the context of a self-help workshop, in your place of work, in your community, or in front of a single empathetic friend, you have progressed toward becoming a fearless public speaker. You have stood up to your fears and said, “I won't let you rule my life!”

Now you must try to continue to challenge yourself! I urge you to make presentations as often as possible, because the best training is experience. Whenever the chance to speak in public comes up, seize it. And use your imagination to create additional opportunities.


Tom Pursues New Venues within His Career

Tom is a graphic artist. By the final session of class, he had made good progress.

-191-

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7 Steps to Fearless Speaking
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • More Praise for 7 Steps to Fearless Speaking *
  • Accolades Amd Affirmations from Students of Lilyan Wilder *
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • The Five Fears 9
  • Let's Get Started 21
  • Step One - Experience Your Voice 29
  • Step Two - Get a Response and Structure Your Thoughts 43
  • Step Three - Establish a Dialogue 61
  • Step Four - Tap Your Creativity 77
  • Step Five - Learn to Persuade 95
  • Step Six - Achieve Your Higher Objective 113
  • Step Seven - Give the Gift of Your Conviction 129
  • The Seven Steps in Action 151
  • Be a Fearless Speaker Every Day 191
  • Appendix A - Voice Work 197
  • Appendix B - If You Need Medical Help 213
  • Acknowledgments 217
  • Index 219
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