Psychology and Law: Truthfulness, Accuracy and Credibility

By Amina Memon; Aldert Vrij et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
TELLING AND DETECTING LIES
Some Characteristics of Deception7
Nonverbal Behaviour and Deception11
Verbal Behaviour and Deception: Criteria-Based Content
Analysis19
Physiological Reactions and Deception: The Polygraph20
Detecting Lies25
Difficulties and Pitfalls for Lie Detectors28
Summary and Conclusion36

This chapter reviews nonverbal, verbal and physiological cues to deception. In particular, we will discuss how liars behave, what they say, how they physiologically react and how good professional lie detectors (police detectives, polygraph examiners and so on) are at detecting truths and lies while paying attention to such cues. The chapter reveals that professional lie catchers, among others, are to some extent able to detect lies by examining behaviour, speech content or physiological reactions. However, as this chapter will also show, no perfect lie detection test exists, and lie detection experts make wrong judgements on a regular basis. We will discuss several problems and pitfalls lie detectors typically face, but we start with some background information, such as a definition of deception, the types of lie people tell, the reasons why people lie and how frequently people tell lies.


SOME CHARACTERISTICS OF DECEPTION

Definition of Deception

Elsewhere we defined deception as “a successful or unsuccessful deliberate attempt, without forewarning, to create in another a belief which the communicator considers to be untrue” (Vrij, 2000a: p. 6). Some elements of this

-7-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Psychology and Law: Truthfulness, Accuracy and Credibility
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • About the Authors ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Telling and Detecting Lies 7
  • Chapter 3 - Facial Appearance and Criminality 37
  • Chapter 4 - Interviewing Suspects 57
  • Chapter 5 - Interviewing Witnesses 87
  • Chapter 6 - Psychological Factors in Eyewitness Testimony 107
  • Chapter 7 - False Memories 127
  • Chapter 8 - Jury Decision Making 147
  • Chapter 9 - The Role of Expert Witnesses 169
  • References 181
  • Index 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 224

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.