Terrorists, Victims, and Society: Psychological Perspectives on Terrorism and Its Consequences

By Andrew Silke | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
The Psychology of Suicidal
Terrorism

ANDREW SILKE
University of Leicester, UK


INTRODUCTION

Suicidal terrorism is not a new phenomenon. It has a history which can be traced back for thousands of years. For example, in the twelfth century an Islamic sect, the Ismal'ili Shi'ites, launched a 200-hundred-year-long campaign of terrorism using suicide attackers. Killing with daggers, lone assassins sacrificed themselves in ruthless attacks against the leaders and nobility of the age (Rapoport, 1990). Appalled at the Ismal'ilis' relentless willingness to sacrifice their own lives, observers argued that such behaviour must be unnatural. The belief quickly spread that the Ismal'ili used copious amounts of mind-altering drugs before launching their attacks, and in Arabic the sect came to be known as the Hashiyan ('those who eat hashish'). But the stories of drug use were untrue, and merely the malicious rumours and propaganda of enemies and onlookers who could not understand the willingness of the attackers to sacrifice their own lives in the effort to kill.

Today, rumour and innuendo still dominate public perceptions of suicide terrorists. Indeed, in Israel some elements of the popular press continue to push the idea that Palestinian suicide bombers take drugs or alcohol before they are sent to carry out the attacks. Just as with the Hashiyan, however, such stories are untrue. Extensive tests are carried out on the remains of suicide bombers by Israel's Institute of Forensic Medicine, and

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Terrorists, Victims, and Society: Psychological Perspectives on Terrorism and Its Consequences
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.