Terrorists, Victims, and Society: Psychological Perspectives on Terrorism and Its Consequences

By Andrew Silke | Go to book overview

Index
Abu Sayyaf, 259
Achille Lauro, 67, 70
acute stress disorder (ASD), 139–140
Adams, Gerry, 38–39, 111–112, 121–122
adolescents, 163, 166–167,170–171, 193, 205
Afghanistan, 222, 224, 258, 266–267
African National Congress (ANC), 230
age and terrorists, 35–37
airport security, 217
al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade, 102
al-Obeid, Mahmoud, 99–100
al-Qaeda, 32–33, 80–81, 94, 101, 224–226, 230, 258, 266, 268
American Psychological Association, 258, 260
American Red Cross, 258
Amnesty International, 189
anarchists, 102
Animal Liberation Front (ALF), 48, 259
anonymity
and aggression, 84–85
and not claiming responsibility for attacks, 178
leading to less concern with government responses, 85–86
psychological impact of, 84—86
anthrax attacks, 178
anti-social personality disorder, 21
anti-terrorism, 257–258
see also counter-terrorism
Arafat, Yasser, 220, 222
attitudes
impact of conflict on, 163–165
attraction to risk-taking, 36
attribution theory, 126–127
Ayyash, Yehiya, 223
Baader, Andreas, 31
Baader-Meinhof Group, 13, 17, 31, 116
Bandura's social-cognitive theory, 83
Bangkok Solution, 68
Baumman, Michael, 38–39, 43, 115
becoming a terrorist, 29–51, 82, 113–114, 163, 203–206
Beirut, 70, 101, 105, 220, 222
suicide attacks (1983), 101, 229
Belfast, 190, 237
bereavement responses, 140–141, 192–195
Berlin, 217
bin Laden, Osama, 32–33, 80, 267–268
biological explanations of terrorism, 10, 35–37
Black September, 219–221
Bouchiki, Ahmed, 220–221
Branch Davidians, 141
British Army, 41–42
Special Air Service (SAS), 215
Bulger, James, 204
Bush, President George H., 226
Bush, President George W., 267
Canary Wharf bombing, 122
capital punishment, 225
Carlos the Jackal (Ilich Ramirez Sanchez), 7, 13, 15, 20, 123
Chazon, Naomi, 231
chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear attacks (CBRN) see weapons of mass destruction
children, 189–209
death or separation from parents, 193–195, 202
experience as victims of terrorism, 70, 166–167, 189–209

-271-

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