Not for Sale: Feminists Resisting Prostitution and Pornography

By Rebecca Whisnant; Christine Stark | Go to book overview

Activist Ann Simonton interviews Carol Smith


Who are women in pornography?:
A conversation

Ann: Carol Smith is currently a volunteer with the Mary Magdalene Project. She is a full-time student, and she hopes to start a new organization called 'Porn Star', helping women involved in pornography who want to get out. Can you tell us, Carol, how did you get into this business?

Carol: I got into pornography 11 years ago. I was highly addicted to drugs, and I had been sexually abused as a child. But at that time I hadn't remembered any of that. And here I am 10 years later. After recovering those memories, I put two and two together—the childhood sexual abuse and pornography—and realized, something needs to be done about this.

Ann: You say you were drug addicted. How old were you when you started using drugs?

Carol: I started drinking and doing drugs when I was about ten. By the time I was fourteen, I went to a rehabilitation center. I was nineteen when I got involved with pornography.

Ann: How did you get involved in pornography? You live in the Los Angeles area? Carol: Yes, I grew up in Calabasas.

Ann: Was it through a friend, or were you modeling?

Carol: I was highly addicted to cocaine. I was doing drugs and living in a house with a bunch of drug dealers, and we were getting evicted. So I was looking in the paper for a job, a regular job. I saw the ad and I went in, and at first I was really scared because I didn't want to do film. I just wanted to do photos. They offered in the ad to just do nude photos. Then the owner of the agency offered me a home—a place to live—and a lot of work if I did film.

At that point in my life I really didn't have any other options.

Ann: Describe your experience being in pornography.

Carol: It was awful. It was horrible.

Ann: In what way?

Carol: The way I felt. The way I felt about myself. The way I was abused by men. The way I let people treat me. And even the effects of it now are awful. Ann: Were you ever physically hurt?

Carol: Yes, I was. A few times.

-352-

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