Reflections of a Civil War Historian: Essays on Leadership, Society, and the Art of War

By Herman Hattaway | Go to book overview

STATE RIGHTS AND LOCAL DEFENSE

THE CRUX OF FRANK L. OWSLEY'S STATE-RIGHTS THESIS REEXAMINED

This piece was originally done as a paper that was read at the
Mid-America Conference on History in September 1983. I and
my collaborators had already entered into an agreement to work
on Why the South Lost the Civil War and we needed the investi-
gation for that book. I present it here slightly revised from its
original speech format.

In The Rebel Shore, James M. Merrill suggested that the early naval attacks on the Atlantic coast brought fear to the hearts of Southerners, who came to know that Yankee sea power “could strike swiftly, mercilessly, and without warning against Confederate shores.” Confederate civilians fled to the interior and pleaded for better defense of their coasts. Merrill wrote: “The theory that state rights were responsible for the ultimate collapse of the Confederacy began when Southern governors balked at dispatching men, arms, and ammunition to the Virginia firing line in order to protect their own seacoasts.” This, he pointed out, set up internal conflict, for Confederate officials were forced to choose between moving troops from the main fronts and exposing the coasts. The latter choice could lead to competition with state governors for men and supplies, for the governors were pressured by citizens to place local defense above the needs of the entire Confederacy1

Certainly it would be an oversimplification to attribute the

1. James M. Merrill, The Rebel Shore: The Story of Union Sea Power in the Civil
War (Boston: Little, Brown, 1957), vi, 13-14; see also pp. 25, 52-53.

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reflections of a Civil War Historian: Essays on Leadership, Society, and the Art of War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.