Research in Organisations and Communities: Tales from the Real World

By Carole Kayrooz; Chris Trevitt | Go to book overview

19
The WAY FORWARD

The interpretive practice of making sense of one's findings is both artful and

political.

(Denzin and Lincoln 1998, p. 30)

In Chapter 17, we described many of the dilemmas that characterise research and highlighted some of the many tensions that need to be navigated and balanced. In Chapter 18, a participatory action research and a systems framework were examined for their potential to assist with understanding the research process, particularly during the initiation and early establishment phases. In this final chapter of the book, we consider the key themes affecting the nature of your role and activities as a researcher, and the stance you may wish to adopt when seeking to conduct valid research in organisational and community contexts. Key themes concern the balance between: working to a fixed role and utilising other aspects of the research role; pursuing both rigour and flexibility in your methodology; and attending to the politics, values and ethics of your context. Attaining a tractable balance within and across these themes, we believe, means achieving a workable arrangement between theory and practice—one of the major challenges of research in organisational and community contexts. We close the chapter by highlighting some of the main points about research dissemination. Once again, understanding the role of various audiences—that is, the context of your reporting—will help to dictate the style of and approach taken to this most important part of the research process.


Researcher roles

As we identified at the end of the previous chapter, role clarification can help enormously in achieving valid research. Building a shared and robust understanding

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