Athena in the Classical World

By Susan Deacy; Alexandra Villing | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHT
ATHENA IN ARCHAIC CORINTH:
THE CREATION OF AN ICONOGRAPHY

Stefan Ritter

Athena is commonly considered the dominant city-protecting deity in the Greek world: the civic deity par excellence. However, there are also cities in which she may have played a different role, and one such city is ancient Corinth where it appears as if she has almost 'swapped' roles with Aphrodite. The recognition of this potentially different role distribution challenges the traditional, Athens-based system of interpreting the iconography of the two goddesses in Corinthian art. This chapter addresses the topical issue of the identification of the helmeted female head on Corinthian coins in the light of the development of the helmet as a distinctive attribute in Archaic Corinthian and Attic art. In spite of some justifiable doubts as to the validity of Athenian iconography as a universal model of explanation, the weight of evidence ultimately suggests that the helmeted goddess of Corinthian coinage cannot be any deity other than Athena.


Athena in Corinthian coinage: the state of discussion

Athena's head on the reverse of the staters of Corinth is one of the most famous types in Greek coinage (PI. 3a). Athena is wearing the so-called Corinthian helmet which is placed on the top of her head in order not to cover her face. This motif became very popular in representations of Athena in Classical times but it was new when Athena's head was added to the reverse of the Corinthian staters at the end of the sixth century BC This fact gives reason to ask why

1 For the introduction of the type between 515 and 500 BC, see CM. Kraay, Archaic and Classical Greek Coins (London: Methuen & Co, 1976), 80–82, figs. 225, 226; J.H. Kroll and N.M. Waggoner, “Dating the earliest coins of Athens, Corinth and

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Athena in the Classical World
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 464

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.