Chinese Thought in a Global Context: A Dialogue between Chinese and Western Philosophical Approaches

By Karl-Heinz Pohl | Go to book overview

REFLECTIONS ON THE “CREATIVE TRANSFORMATION OF
CHINESE TRADITION”**:UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN, MADISON
LIN YÜ-SHENG *Translated by Michael S. Duke and Josephine Chiu-Duke
1. Concerns for the modernization of Chinese thought brought about by an analysis of May Fourth to talis tic anti-traditionalism

The first germs of my ideas on the pursuit of “creative transformation” began to develop as a result of my reflections on the nature, causes, and consequences of the totalistic iconoclasm1 characteristic

* Author's Note: I am very grateful to Professors Michael S. Duke and Jo-
sephine Chiu-Duke for their painstaking efforts to render this Chinese article as
accurately as possible in English. However, in going over their translation I
decided to free myself from my own Chinese and revise the English, even to
rewrite certain passages and add some notes. Thus, the text published here dif-
fers somewhat in length from the Chinese original and partly also in content. All
errors which still remain are mine.

The introductory section in the Chinese original, which is significant only in
the context of Chinese-language debates concerning the thesis presented here, has
been omitted from this article.

** Translators' Note: This translation is based on the latest Chinese version,
which is a further revised text based on the article entitled, “Chuangzao xing
zhuanhua de zaisi yu zairen” (“Further Reflections on and Comprehension of the
'Creative Transformation' [of Chinese Tradition]”) published in The Chinese
Intellectual (Zhishi fenzi), New York, vol. 10, No. 1 (Autumn, 1994), pp. 22-29,
and Res Publica (Gonggong luncong), Beijing: Sanlian, 1995, I, 230-257. This
version is published in Jianguan sishi zhounian wenhua yishu xueshu yanjiang
lunwen ji (Proceedings of the Conference on Art and Culture in Commemoration
of the 40th Anniversary of the National Museum of History), Taipei: National
Museum of History, 1996, pp. 171-206.

1 Totalistic is not the same as total. The word “totalistic” implies a holistic or
organismic conception of the past. It refers to an ideological commitment to the
cause of total rejection of Chinese political, social, and cultural tradition. A
totalistic attack on the Chinese tradition could have been possible primarily out of
a holistic or organismic understanding of that tradition, which assumed that it

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Chinese Thought in a Global Context: A Dialogue between Chinese and Western Philosophical Approaches
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 408

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.