Egypt, Israel, and the Ancient Mediterranean World: Studies in Honor of Donald B. Redford

By Gary N. Knoppers; Antoine Hirsch | Go to book overview

ARCHAEOMETRY AT MENDES: 1990–2002

Larry A. Pavlish


Historical Perspective

General Introduction and History: Modem Perspective

The archaeological site of Mendes (fig. la) is, at the same time, one of the most threatened and perhaps the best-preserved site in the Nile Delta (Stanley and Warne 1993). This situation is the consequence of a catastrophic hydrological event that took place about two thousand years ago, when the Mendesian Branch of the Nile either suddenly moved away from the site, or the site's harbour and other water access routes silted up and became unnavigable. The disappearance of these channels effectively removed Mendes from the mainstream of Egyptian commerce. Mendes and its environs remained relatively isolated until the establishment of 20th century land reclamation projects that released much of Egypt from its dependency on inundation-based agriculture. With the construction of the Aswan High Dam in the mid 1960's, the area around Mendes become prime, flood-free, agricultural land (prior to the High Dam, informants report that the annual flood waters came within several kilometres of Tel el Rub'a). The resulting rise in agricultural production, however, in addition to a fast growing population and increased salinization of the soil, may have disastrous long-term consequences. Given current land-use practices, the steady rise in food requirements from increasingly less productive lands for a population that is increasing at a rate of 1x106 per 9 months may result in the eventual collapse of the Delta agricultural system and its socio-political base (Stanley and Warne 1993). This modern situation is comparable to the succession of ancient ecological disasters that progressed slowly up the Tigris and Euphrates and brought an end to Sumer, Old Babylonia and Assyria (Russell 1972). Today, the solution to this dilemma is obtained most easily by acquiring new land, and archaeological sites in the Delta, like Mendes, are prime candidates for expropriation. Many sites in the Delta have already gone under the plough. Consequently, the research being carried out at Delta sites is, in a real sense, a kind of rescue-research archaeology.

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Egypt, Israel, and the Ancient Mediterranean World: Studies in Honor of Donald B. Redford
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 596

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.