Handbook of Classical Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period : 330 B.C.-A.D. 400

By Stanley E. Porter | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 8
PHILOSOPHICAL PROSE

Dirk M. Schenkeveld

Free University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands


I. INTRODUCTION

In the Hellenistic and Roman period philosophical treatises in the widest sense were written in multifarious forms and styles and for various purposes. Here, attention will be paid to prose writings, and poems such as Cleanthes' Hymn to Zeus and Lucretius's De rerum natura or Proclus's Hymns and Manilius's Astronomicon will be left out of consideration. The latter category requires a different approach and to discuss these texts in this contribution would greatly exceed the limits of size.1

The approach to philosophical prose taken here is that of form, rather than purpose. By form I mean dialogue, diatribe and thesis, but also ego-documents and technical writings such as the handbook, isagoge, the longer

and commentary. The goals or purposes of these texts may be pure instruction for the beginner or the more advanced student, but may also be consolatory, protreptic and paraenetic or of some other kind. It turns out that the approach by form is more manageable but for one exception: a separate section is reserved for protreptic and paraenesis. This has come about because division of assignments has the genre of Letters (Epistolary style) discussed elsewhere, and Epicurus's paraenetic epistle could easily have gone unnoticed. Inclusion of technical writings serves as a reminder that not all prose is Kunstprosa, to borrow Norden's term, but even there we may find traces of rhetorical influence.

1 Originally, I had promised to make two contributions, one on the philosophical
treatise and one on Stoic philosophers. Because, however, the style of Stoic philoso-
phers is not different from that of other philosophers in this period it was more
convenient to discuss texts of philosophers together with texts on philosophical sub-
jects all together in one contribution.

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Classical Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period : 330 B.C.-A.D. 400
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 902

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.