Handbook of Classical Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period, 330 B.C.-A.D. 400

By Stanley E. Porter | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 24
PLUTARCH*

Hubert M. Martin, Jr.

University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA

The Greek biographer, essayist, and Academic philosopher Plutarch was born about AD 45, during the reign of the emperor Claudius, in the Boeotian town of Chaeronea, which was located approximately eighty miles northwest of Athens and had been the site of two impor tant battles, the victory of Philip of Macedon over the Athenians and Thebans in 338 BC and that of the Roman general Sulla over Midiridates of Pontus in 86 BC.1 After completing his education in Athens with the study of philosophy under the Platonist Ammonius, Plutarch returned to Chaeronea, where he founded a philosophical academy of his own, played a leading role in the public life of his native town, and continued to reside until his death soon after 120 during Hadrian's reign. Awarded both Roman and Athenian citizen ship, Plutarch also served for many years as a priest of Apollo at

* Inasmuch as the following (invaluable) secondary sources constitute an appro
priate point of departure for all further investigation of Plutarch and his works, their
consultation is universally recommended and they will not normally be cited again:
K. Ziegler, “Plutarchos von Chaeroneia”, in Pauly-Wissowa's Reakm.zyklopad.it der
klassischen Altertumswissenschafi
21.1 (1951), pp. 636–962 and the introductions and
notes in W. C. Helmbold et al. (trans, and eds.), Plutarch's Moralia (vols. 6–9, 11–15;
LCL; London: Heinemann; Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1939–69);
R. Flacelière et at. (eds. and trans.), Plutarque: Vies (16 vols.; Budé; Paris: Société
d'édition “Les Belles Lettres”, 1957–83); and J. Defradas, R. Flacelière et al. (eds.
and trans.), Plutarque: Oeuvres morales (11 vols.; Budé; Paris: Société d'édition “Les
Belles Lettres”, 1972—). All translations of Plutarch and of the Moralia tides, the
latter with occasional modifications, are those of the LCL.

1 Plutarch the man is not easily separated from Plutarch the writer. On his life,
times, and works, see R. H. Barrow, Plutarch and His Times (Bloomington and London:
Indiana University Press, 1967); C. P.Jones, Plutarch and Rome (Oxford: Oxford Uni
versity Press, 1971); D. A. Russell, Plutarch (New York: Scribners, 1973)—and, for
brief surveys, A. Lesky, A History of Greek Literature (trans. J. Willis and C. de Heer;
New York: Crowell, 1966), pp. 819–29; J. R. Hamilton, Plutarch. Alexander: A
Commentary
(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1969), pp. xiii-lxix passim; C. B. R.
Pelling, Plutarch: Life of Antony (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988),
pp. 1–10.

-715-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Classical Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period, 330 B.C.-A.D. 400
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 902

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.