Handbook of Classical Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period, 330 B.C.-A.D. 400

By Stanley E. Porter | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 28
RHETORIC IN THE CHRISTIAN APOCRYPHA

Richard I. Pervo

Seabury-Western Theological Seminary, Evanston, Illinois, USA


I. INTRODUCTION

Two of the more cumbersome terms bequeathed to the study of early Judaism and early Christianity by the ecclesiastical tradition are “Apocrypha” and “Pseudepigrapha”. Both are judgmental; neither provides a basis for categorization. Canonicity is a valid religious norm that may erect obstacles to historical analysis. “Pseudepigrapha” has literal reference to texts issued under the name of an authority other than the actual composer of the work. “Apocryphal” literally means “hidden” and thus implies secret books quite possibly pro duced by wayward sects. In antiquity pseudepigraphy was a device for identifying the authority to which the text appealed or for making the words of a departed leader current. As a result of debates that arose in the period of the Protestant Reformation the “New Testa ment Apocrypha” are analogous to texts classified as “Old Testament Pseudepigrapha”. The works so designated are often regarded as books that aped their canonical antecedents with the object of inclusion within the Bible.

If some of the texts normally included within this category do offer challenges to the views found in the writings later judged canonical, most of them formally ignore the alleged competition. The idea that these books led an underground existence is equally erroneous. Many of the apocrypha were an important source of spiritual nurture, witness their vast contribution to Christian art. The proliferation of apocry pha in versions, abridgements, and adaptations is another testament to their vitality.

Perhaps the clearest criterion for the distinction of “apocryphal” from many other early Christian texts is generic, for this literature includes gospels, acts, letters, and apocalypses, many of which exhibit

-793-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Classical Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period, 330 B.C.-A.D. 400
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 902

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.