Restoration: Old Testament, Jewish, and Christian Perspectives

By James M. Scott | Go to book overview

“EXILE” AND “RESTORATION”
IN THE CONCEPTUAL WORLD OF ANCIENT JUDAISM

Shemaryahu Talmon
Hebrew University


THE CONCEPTUAL SIGNIFICATION OF “EXILE” AND
“RESTORATION”

Exile and restoration are interrelated concepts, which pertain to two contrastive historical phenomena, like movement and countermovement. They are not the particular experience of specific individuals or societies in singular, unparalleled historical situations. Rather, they belong in the realm of universal human experience. In the present paper I intend to explore concisely at first the social, historical and religious, in short, the existential dimensions of these concepts generally, and then to refer specifically their application to the history of the Jewish people in the early Second Temple period.

The term “exile” denotes the forced removal of individuals or groups of people from their homeland. The corresponding Greek terms ἀπoικία or μετoικία quite accurately express the resulting condition of being “away from home.” In biblical Hebrew the state of being in exile is defined by

or , derived from , which originally means “to strip” or “to remove” (cf. Ezek 12:3–7). Golah describes not only the body of expatriates who had been forced to leave their homeland, but also alludes to the land that was partly denuded of its inhabitants through war and expulsion: “Your land shall be divided up with a measuring line … and Israel shall surely be deported from their land ” (Amos 7:17).

Deportation violently severs the natural bonds of the banished with their land, rips apart physical and spiritual, emotional and cultural ties, engenders a break with the tried and true, an alienatio mentis, and entails a forced transfer to the gaping void of the unknown. Together with the loss of the familiar landscape, displaced people are prone to be deprived of inherited values, such as their mother tongue and timehonored manners and customs. The individual experiences expatriation as an event of personal rather than historical significance, often throwing him or her into existential despair. A community incurs exile

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Restoration: Old Testament, Jewish, and Christian Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 602

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.