Children's Literature: A Reader's History, from Aesop to Harry Potter

By Seth Lerer | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION: Toward a New History of Children's Literature

1. Francis Spufford, The Child That Books Built: A Life in Reading (London: Faber, 2002), p.9.

2. On the rise of what I have elsewhere called biblio-autobiography (that is, the chronicle of life told in terms of books read), see my “Epilogue: Falling Asleep over the History of the Book,” PMLA 121 (2006): 229–34. Besides Spufford's memoir, another brilliant version of this kind of narrative is Alberto Manguel, A History of Reading (New York: Knopf, 1999), and also his A Reading Diary (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2004).

3. Philippe Ariès, Centuries of Childhood: A Social History of Family Life, trans. Robert Baldick (New York: Knopf, 1962); originally L'Enfant et la vie familiale sous l'ancien régime (Paris: Plon, 1960). For an important reassessment of Ariès's achievement, and its implications for the scholarly study of the history of childhood, see Margaret L. King, “Concepts of Childhood: What We Know and Where We Might Go,” Renaissance Quarterly 60 (2007): 371–407.

4. Among the many studies that have sought to recover a history of childhood in the pre-modern period, see in particular Mark Golden, Children and Childhood in Classical Athens (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1990); Beryl Rawson, Children and Childhood in Roman Italy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003); Steven Ozment, Ancestors: The Loving Family in Old Europe (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2001); Nicholas Orme, Medieval Children (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2001); C. John Sommerville, The Discovery of Childhood in Puritan England (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1992); and the two-volume History of the European Family, edited by David I. Kertzer and Marzio Barbagli: Family Life in Early Modern Times, 1500–1789, and Family Life in the Long Nineteenth Century, 1789–1913 (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2001, 2002). For a full bibliography on the historical study of childhood, see the material in King, “Concepts of Childhood,” pp. 398–407.

5. Marx Wartofsky, “The Child's Construction of the World and the World's Construction of the Child: From Historical Epistemology to Historical Psychology,” in The

-337-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Children's Literature: A Reader's History, from Aesop to Harry Potter
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 385

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.