Ireland: Contested Ideas of Nationalism and History

By Hugh F. Kearney | Go to book overview

Chapter Two

1875: Faith or Fatherland?
The Contested Symbolism of Irish Nationalism
(2000)

Emmet Larkin was the first historian to draw attention to the significance of the Roman Catholic church in “the making of modern Ireland.” His massive multivolume history is now recognized as an essential starting point for future scholars.1 Thanks to his formidable researches, it is now necessary to place Paul Cullen, archbishop of Dublin, John MacHale, archbishop of Tuam, Thomas Croke, archbishop of Cashel, and W. J. Walsh, archbishop of Dublin, alongside the figures of Peel, O'Connell, Gladstone, Parnell, and Balfour. These bishops were able men of considerable political power with whom successive British governments had to deal in the second half of the nineteenth century and the early decades of the twentieth. Indeed, the Catholic hierarchy saw themselves as leaders of the Irish nation, as much as, if not more than, politicians like Parnell, Redmond, and Dillon. In making sense of Irish nationalism, it is necessary to follow Larkin's lead and keep the Catholic hierarchy at the center of the picture.

Larkin's work may be said to have introduced a new dimension into the study of Irish nationalism. However, it is not the only source of innovation. We may mention in particular a new level of sophistication in the study of nationalism associated with the work of Eric Hobsbawm, Terence Ranger, Ernest Gellner, and many others.2 It is now possible to place Irish nationalism in a comparative context. For these scholars the main concern is uncovering the problematic aspects of the concept “nation.” In contrast nationalists, and nationalist historians, look upon their own nation and nationhood as in some sense “God-given” or “natural.” They see their national identity as resting upon “language” or “race” or “religion” or “territory”

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ireland: Contested Ideas of Nationalism and History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 309

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.