What Brown v. Board of Education Should Have Said: The Nation's Top Legal Experts Rewrite America's Landmark Civil Rights Decision

By Jack M. Balkin | Go to book overview

About the Contributors

Bruce Ackerman is Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science at Yale University. His major works include Social Justice in the Liberal State (1980) and We the People, vol. 1 (1991), vol. 2 (1998). He has also written many books on practical problems ranging from housing policy to environmental law to welfare policy to international relations—including, most recently, The Stakeholder Society (with Anne Alstott, 1999). He is a member of the American Law Institute and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Jack M. Balkin is Knight Professor of Constitutional Law and the First Amendment at Yale Law School and the founder and director of Yale's Information Society Project, an interdisciplinary center devoted to the study of law and the new information technologies. Professor Balkin writes in the areas of constitutional law, jurisprudence, and social and cultural theory. He is the author of Cultural Software: A Theory of Ideology (1998), and Processes of Constitutional Decisionmaking (with Paul Brest, Sanford Levinson, and Akhil Reed Amar, 4th ed. 2000).

Derrick A. Bell is Visiting Professor of Law at NYU Law School. A law teacher for more than thirty years, he is the author of Race, Racism, and American Law (4th ed., 2000); Afrolantica Legacies (1998); Constitutional Conflicts (1997); Gospel Choirs: Psalms of Survival in an Alien Land Called Home (1996); Confronting Authority: Reflections of an Ardent Protester (1994); Faces at the Bottom of the Well: The Permanence of Racism (1992); and And We Are Not Saved: The Elusive Quest for Racial Justice (1987).

Drew S. Days III is Alfred M. Rankin Professor at Yale Law School. Professor Days served on the staff of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund from 1969 to 1977. From 1977 to 1980, he was the Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights in the Carter Administration. Professor Days

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