The Scandal and Credulities of John Aubrey

By John Collier | Go to book overview

SIR THOMAS MORGAN.

SIR THOMAS MORGAN: Sir John Lenthall told me that at the taking of Dunkyrke, Marshall Turenne, and I thinke, Cardinal Mezarine too, had a great mind to see this famous Warrior. They gave him a visitt, and wheras they thought to have found an Achillean or gigantique person, they saw a little man, not many degrees above a dwarfe, sitting in a hutt of turves, with his fellowe soldiers, smoaking a Pipe about 3 inches (or neer so) long, with a green hatt-case on. He spake with a very exile tone, and did cry-out to the Soldiers, when angry with them, Sirrah, I'le cleave your skull! as if the wordes had been prolated by an eunuch.

-143-

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The Scandal and Credulities of John Aubrey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction. ix
  • Sir Thomas More. 1
  • William Herbert, 1st Earle of Pembroke. 4
  • Thomas Cooper. 8
  • Sir Philip Sydney. 9
  • Mary Herbert, Countess of Pembroke. 12
  • Edward De Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford. 16
  • Sir John Popham. 17
  • Dame Olave Sharington. 23
  • Sir Miles Fleetwood. 29
  • Sylvanus Scory. 30
  • William Shakespear. 33
  • Sir Walter Raleigh. 37
  • Walter Raleigh, Son of Sir Walter. 50
  • Madam Curtin. 52
  • Francis Bacon. 53
  • John Overall. 60
  • Lancelot Andrews. 65
  • John Whitson. 69
  • Alexander Gill. 70
  • Ben Jonson. 74
  • Venetia Digby. 80
  • Richard Corbet. 84
  • Thomas Stump. 89
  • John Selden. 91
  • Ralph Kettell. 93
  • Thomas Chaloner. 105
  • Walter Rumsey. 108
  • Thomas Goffe, Of East Clandon. 110
  • Thomas Bushell 112
  • Sir Henry Blount. 117
  • John Milton. 122
  • Eleanor Ratcliffe, Countess of Sussex. 130
  • Lucius Cary, Viscount Falkland. 131
  • Gwyn. 135
  • Sir William Davenant. 136
  • Sir Thomas Morgan. 143
  • Bess Broughton. 144
  • William Harcourt. 147
  • George Monk. 148
  • Sir Richard Napier. 156
  • John Birkenhead. 162
  • Caisho Burroughes. 163
  • Sir William Platers. 166
  • Edmund Waller. 168
  • Sir Kenelm Digby. 172
  • Thomas Triplett. 174
  • Sir John Suckling. 176
  • Thomas Fairfax, 3rd Baron. 185
  • Mr. Towes, Etc. 186
  • Richard Lovelace. 189
  • Isaac Barrow. 190
  • Sir John Denham. 197
  • John Colet. 199
  • Francis Fry. 200
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