Church and State in Tanzania: Aspects of Changing Relationships, 1961-1994

By Frieder Ludwig | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This book is the result of a dialogue and hopes to stimulate more dialogue. It is the result of a dialogue because the conversations which I had in Tanzania and elsewhere contributed valuable insights. It hopes to stimulate more dialogue because its attempt to examine the role of the church in Nyerere's Tanzania is necessarily selective.

I did most of the research for this book as part of my doctoral thesis at the Department of Theology, Heidelberg University, between 1992 and 1994. The results were first published in German. For this English version, I have revised the dissertation and added new material. While the original focus was on the Protestant churches and especially on the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Tanzania, more consideration has now been given to developments in the Roman Catholic Church and also in the Anglican Church. The period covered spans the years from the attainment of independence until 1994, since I did not visit Tanzania after that time.

The project was stimulated by Professor Gerhard Grohs (Institute of Ethnology and African Studies, Mainz University) and funded by the Erika – Sulzmann – Stiftung (Mainz) and by the Towae – Stiftung (Heidelberg). Professor Grohs gave valuable comments on the work as it progressed. The book profited greatly by the supervision of Professor Theo Sundermeier and Professor Hans-Werner Gensichen in Heidelberg. In Dar es Salaam, the discussions with Dr. J. Mlahagwa (Department of History), Professor C.K. Omari (Department of Sociology) and Professor I.N. Kimambo (Department of History) prooved to be extremely valuable. Without the research permission of the Tanzania Commission for Science and Technology, this work would not have been possible; the assistance of Mrs J.K. Ligunda in particular is very much appreciated. Dr. Anneliese Gensichen and Rita Nguva took a great deal of trouble to teach me Swahili. Regina Feindt, Stefanie Kolbusa, Gerlind Scheckenbach and Christine Zilger helped to translate some important documents. In regard to this revised English version, I am especially indebted to the comments of Professor Adrian Hastings.

Special thanks go to all who allowed themselves to be interviewed and who were willing, often at short notice, to take an hour or longer from their work to answer my questionnaire. Very often, they not only shared their experiences, but also offered help and hospitality. The interviews were carried out (in chronological order) with: B. Staub (Director of the Tanganyika Christian Refugee Service),

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