God's Kingdom and God's Son: The Background in Mark's Christology from Concepts of Kingship in the Psalms

By Robert D. Rowe | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
THE KINGDOM OF GOD IN EARLY JUDAISM

Mark nowhere explains the meaning of

in the preaching of Jesus. Before we look at the contexts in which it occurs in Mark to attempt to make deductions as to its meaning, it would be wise to glean what we can about the meaning of the phrase from contemporary Judaism.

Leaving aside the Old Testament for the time being, let us survey the other evidence. We should not follow Norman Perrin in restricting our investigation to those passages where 'the kingdom of God' or an equivalent phrase is actually found,1 but should also consider passages where God is called 'King' or described in terms of kingship.2


1. Addressing God as 'King' - in the Apocrypha

First we should note that in prayers of this period,3 God is very often addressed as 'King', and of course we have seen that prayer was the context of some of the Psalms speaking of Yahweh's kingship. Judith prays (9:12):

Hear, O hear me, God of my father, God of the inheritance of Israel,
Lord of heaven and earth, Creator of the waters, King of all thy cre-
ation, hear my prayer!

Here, as frequently elsewhere, 'King' is just one of a number of titles applied to God, but it is linked with God's creation, which is one of the themes of the Psalms of Yahweh's kingship. In fact, part of Judith's song of thankgiving, which comes near the end of the book (16:13-15), bears many similarities to these Psalms. She sings to God

1 N. Perrin, The Kingdom of God in the Teaching of Jesus (1963), pp. 168fT.

2 Cf. M. Lattke, 'On the Jewish Background of the Synoptic Concept “The King-
dom of God'” (first publ. in German, 1975; ET in The Kingdom of God in the Teaching of
Jesus, ed. B. Chilton (1984), pp. 72-91); O. Camponovo, Konigtum, Königsherrschaft und
Reich Gottes in den früjüdischen Schriften (1984).

3 The period under review is taken to include the documents of the Apocrypha and
Pseudepigrapha that are prior to or contemporaneous with the life of Jesus and the
writing of the gospels, as well as the Qumran documents.

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
God's Kingdom and God's Son: The Background in Mark's Christology from Concepts of Kingship in the Psalms
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 438

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.