Freethinkers of Medieval Islam: Ibn Al-Rawandi, Abu Bakr Al-Razi and Their Impact on Islamic Thought

By Sarah Stroumsa | Go to book overview

GENERAL INDEX
Abraham, 152
Abrahamite, 41, 147
adab al-jadal, 173, 174, 182
adab al-mujādala, 174
Adam, 145, 152, 166, 216
affirmation and negation, 184ff.
afterlife, 129
Agathodaimon, 166
agnosticism, 140, 141
aher, 221
ahl al-jadal, 193
ahl al-kilāb, 29
ahl al-raʾy, 9
alchemy, 89, 92, 93
Rāzī's interest in, 88
Alexander of Aphrodisias, 98
ʿAlī, 41
Alexandrian philosophical tradition, 164
allegory, 23
ʿAmmār al-Baṣrī, 31
Andalus, 210
angels, 83, 195
presence of in Muḥammad's battles, 75
anthropomorphism, 100
anti-Christian debate, 26
anti-Muslim Jewish books, 211
anti-prophetism, 109, 189
Apocrypha, 162
apologetics, 27, 214
Christian, 196, 211
apostate, 86
Jewish, 100, 230
apostate: see mulid
apostles
as God's providence, 112
argumentation
logical structure of, 174
arguments
anti-prophetical, 152
for prophecy, 78
Aristotle, 98, 186
ʿaúyya, 22, 67, 86, 110, 235
astrologers, 61
atheism, 8, 121ff., 45, 140, 192, 122
Atomism, 39, 171
Greek, 172
Attributes
negative, 32
authentic prophets, 94
authenticity, 30
of a religion, 32
authority, 9, 74, 82, 99
ecclesiastic, 7, 8
rejection of, 121
religious, 131
authoritative knowledge, 13
authorities
religious, 105
authority of tradition
rejection of, 115
Averroes, 98
Barāhima, 5, 24, 38, 79, 135, 145ff., 146, 148, 150, 152, 154, 155, 156, 157, 160, 161, 162, 164, 166, 168, 169, 194, 195, 215, 219
taxonomy of, 159
Bible
criticism of, 100, 101, 143, 220
blasphemy, 87, 134, 185, 199, 220
Boddhisattva, 158
Brahmans, 56, 145, 159, 161, 162, 163, 164, 216
Buddhism, 129, 159, 195
Hinayana, 158
Mahayana, 158
Byzantium, 143
Chariot
Divine, 223ff.
Christian intellectual, 14
Christianity, 3, 8, 142
Arab, under Islam, 214ff.
Arabic-speaking, 19
Latin, 216
polemics with Islam, 194
refutation of, 40
Christianity/Christians, 12, 23, 38
code of behaviour in theological disputations, 173
code of behaviour: See also debate; manners
code of disputation, 188
common sense, 233

-251-

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