7

Prose literature: the period of maturity

This chapter continues the account begun in the previous chapter, describing the development of the novel and short story from the 1930s to around 1967, when a major change occurred in the prevailing mood of the Arab world that is reflected in much Arabic fiction. Like all such divisions, the cut-off point between what I have called the 'period of development' and the 'period of maturity' is a slightly arbitrary one – probably even more arbitrary than in the case of modern Arabic poetry, which falls fairly easily into three distinct styles, if not distinct periods. What is clear, however, is that from time to time individual works or authors appear that mark a shift in contemporary attitudes or usher in a new phase of development. Muḥammad Ḥusayn Haykal's Zaynab, discussed in the previous chapter, has been almost universally acknowledged as one such work, and though less agreement might perhaps be found among the critics for a corresponding work from the early 1930s, there can be little doubt that a major advance in Egyptian and Arabic novelistic technique occurred during that period. As this advance, to my mind, is well exemplified by the publication of the two parts of Tawfīq al-Ḥakīm's major novel ‛Awdat al-Rūḥ in 1933, it is with this work that I shall begin.

Although Tawfīq al-Ḥakīm's continuing reputation undoubtedly owes more to his plays than to his novels, his novels, beginning with ‛Awdat al-Rūḥ itself, in fact seem to me to hold a position of an almost equivalent importance for the development of modern Arabic literature generally. Begun in French during his period of study in Paris from 1925 to 1928,1‛Awdat al-Rūḥ was closely modelled on the author's experiences in Cairo during the First World War and as such, continues an autobiographical trend prominent during the early development of modern Arabic fiction, as already noted in the previous chapter. Essentially, the work depicts the life and often frustrated loves of a middle-class Egyptian family of the period, culminating in the 1919 Egyptian popular revolt led by Sa‛d Zaghlūl that for al-Ḥakīm represented the 'Return of the Spirit' of the work's title. Structurally, the work suffers from numerous faults, most notably the tendency to rambling digression that mars many of al-Ḥakīm's works: long sections in the second part are devoted to a debate about the nature of the

-115-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Modern Arabic Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The New Edinburgh Islamic Surveys ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Note on Abbreviations vi
  • Preface and Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction - What is Modern Arabic Literature? ix
  • 1: The Background 1
  • 2: The Revival 23
  • 3: Neo-Classical Poetry 42
  • 4: Romanticism in Arabic Poetry 60
  • 5: Poetry: the Modernists 79
  • 6: Prose Literature: Early Developments 97
  • 7: Prose Literature: the Period of Maturity 115
  • 8: The Sixties Generation and Beyond 139
  • 9: Drama: Early Experiments 163
  • 10: Drama: the Period of Maturity 178
  • 11: Conclusion 199
  • Bibliography 201
  • Index 212
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 222

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.