Zora Neale Hurston and a History of Southern Life

By Tiffany Ruby Patterson | Go to book overview

Notes

Prologue

1. Zora Neale Hurston, Dust Tracks on a Road (1942; repr., Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984), 242.

2. Fannie Hurst was born into a middle-class Jewish family in Missouri. She apparently reconstructed her identity as gentile when she entered the world of letters in New York. Her ability to pass puts her surprise at Hurston in context. See Cynthia Ann Brandimerte, “Fannie Hurst and Her Fiction: Prescriptions for American Working Women” (Ph.D. diss., University of Texas at Austin, 1980), 84; Zora Neale Hurston, “Fannie Hurst: By Her Ex-Amanuensis,” Saturday Review (9 Oct. 1937).

3. Fannie Hurst, “Zora Neale Hurston: A Personality Sketch,” Yale University Library Gazette 35 (July 1960): 20.

4. Brandimerte, “Fannie Hurst and Her Fiction,” 84.

5. Quoted in Hurst, “Zora Neale Hurston,” 20.


Introduction

1. Toni Morrison, “Rootedness: The Ancestor as Foundation,” in Black Women Writers, 1950–1980, ed. Mari Evans (New York: Anchor/Doubleday Books, 1983), 342.

2. Wallace Thurman's satirical novel The Blacker the Berry (1929) certainly exposed the absurdity of color prejudice in black communities. Jessie Fauset's novels Plum Bun (1929) and Chinaberry Tree (1931) explored the phenomenon of passing and its conflicts for women. Before Fauset, Charles W. Chestnutt and Nella Larsen had examined these questions. Only Wallace Thurman specifically addressed color prejudice from the perspective of a “dark-skinned” woman and the impact of color prejudice

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Zora Neale Hurston and a History of Southern Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Prologue 1
  • Introduction - Rootedness—the History of Private Life 5
  • 1: Reconstructing Past Presents 19
  • 2: Portraits of the South: Zora Neale Hurston's Politics of Place 32
  • 3: A Place Between Home and Horror 50
  • 4: Sex and Color in Eatonville, Florida 90
  • 5: A Transient World of Labor 128
  • 6: Patronage: Anatomy of a Predicament 159
  • Epilogue 183
  • Notes 185
  • Index 217
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