Millennial Makeover: Myspace, Youtube, and the Future of American Politics

By Morley Winograd; Michael D. Hais | Go to book overview

PREFACE

IN THE SPIRIT OF OPENNESS and full disclosure that the Millennial Generation treasures, the readers of this book should be forewarned that two life-long Democrats wrote it. Both of us have shared a deep passion for politics and baseball, not necessarily in that order. Along the way, we rooted for the same political party, if not always the same baseball teams. We have also both been fortunate enough to pursue rewarding careers in the private sector.

We did, however, take time out from those more personal pursuits to help orchestrate the successful resurrection of the Michigan Democratic Party after it was buried in the 1972 Nixon landslide. One of us, Mike Hais, supplied the survey research data for Carl Levin's first successful campaign for the U.S. Senate, in 1978, against Senator Robert Griffin, the Republican minority leader. Mike then helped Congressman Jim Blanchard win the state's gubernatorial election in 1982, ending a twenty-year Republican reign. The other author, Morley Winograd, was the state party's chairman from 1973 until 1979, during which time the party recaptured a majority of the state's congressional delegation and, for a brief moment in time, both houses of the state legislature. Together, with the help of the great men and women of the United Auto Workers, we turned the tables on the Republicans and their ticket-splitting strategy, honed to perfection by Governors George Romney and William Milliken in the 1960s and 1970s. We used that approach to elect Democrats by splitting off moderate Republicans from the increasingly conservative candidates the GOP was beginning to nominate, even back then.

After the 1990 midterm elections, the Democratic Leadership Council (DLC) invited Morley, along with Doug Ross, another Michigan Democratic friend, to deliver a presentation entitled “How to Win

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