Authorizing Marriage? Canon, Tradition, and Critique in the Blessing of Same-Sex Unions

By Mark D. Jordan; Meghan T. Sweeney et al. | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION

1. This volume grows out of a roundtable organized within a much larger project on “Sex, Marriage, and Family in the Religions of the Book.” The larger project was undertaken during 2001–2003 by the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Religion, under the direction of John Witte Jr., with support from The Pew Charitable Trusts through a grant to Emory University. The authors are grateful to all and each of these for their indispensable support and assistance.


CHAPTER ONE
“Surpassing the Love of Women”

I am grateful to Susan Ackerman, William Gilders, Tracy Lemos, Steven Weitz-
man, Marsha White, the participants in Brown University's Culture and Reli-
gion of the Ancient Mediterranean faculty seminar (January 2004), and the con-
tributors to this volume for critical feedback on an earlier draft of this essay.
Needless to say, any errors of fact or judgment remain my responsibility alone.

1. For the sexual interpretation among nonspecialists, see, e.g., Tom Horner, Jonathan Loved David: Homosexuality in Biblical Times (Philadelphia: Westminster, 1978), 26–39; Jody Hirsh, “In Search of Role Models,” in Twice Blessed: On Being Lesbian, Gay, and Jewish, ed. Christie Balka and Andy Rose (Boston: Beacon, 1989), 84. For a nonsexual but homoerotic reading by a nonspecialist, see David F. Greenberg, The Construction of Homosexuality (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1988), 114. Greenberg speaks of “homophilic innuendos” throughout the passages in question and speculates that an explicit sexual relationship may have been present in the original text and deleted by editors. David Halperin understands the relationship to be erotic, though not sexual (One Hundred Years of Homosexuality and Other Essays on Greek Love [New York: Routledge, 1990], 11, 83). Among specialists, see especially the article by Silvia Schroer and Thomas Staubli, “Saul, David, und Jonatan—eine Dreiecksgeschichte? Ein Beitrag zum Thema 'Homosexualita¨t im Ersten Testament,'” Bibel und Kirche 51 (1996):15–22, which argues that the relationship was homoerotic and “very probably” sexual as well (“eine homoerotische und sehr wahrscheinlich auch homosexuelle Beziehung,” 15); David Gunn, The Fate of King Saul (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1980), 93; and Erhard Gerstenberger, Das dritte Buch Mose Leviticus(Göttingen: Vandenhoeck &Ruprecht, 1993), 271. M artti Nissinen (“Die Liebe von David und Jonatan als Frage der modernen Exegese,” Biblica 80 [1999]: 262) writes of the relationship as portrayed in the “History of David's Rise” as a friendship with some homoerotic coloring, though for him there is no evidence that it was explicitly sexual. Susan Ackerman argues for the presence of “eroticized

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Authorizing Marriage? Canon, Tradition, and Critique in the Blessing of Same-Sex Unions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 199

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.