Nietzsche, Godfather of Fascism? On the Uses and Abuses of a Philosophy

By Jacob Golomb; Robert S. Wistrich | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS

MENAHEM BRINKER is Professor of Hebrew Literature and Philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Henry B. Crown Professor of Modern Hebrew Studies at the University of Chicago. He is the author of five books in Hebrew on philosophy and literary theory, aesthetics, and modern Hebrew literature. His forthcoming book is Last Jews or Modern Hebrews (Yale UP).

DANIEL W. CONWAY is Professor of Philosophy and Director of Graduate Studies in Philosophy at The Pennsylvania State University. He has published widely on topics in political philosophy, contemporary European philosophy, and nineteenth-century philosophy. He is the author of Nietzsche and the Political (Routledge, 1997) and Nietzsche's Dan- gerous Game (Cambridge UP, 1997).

STANLEY CORNGOLD is Professor of German and Comparative Literature at Princeton University. He has written Complex Pleasure: Forms of Feeling in German Literature (Stanford UP, 1998), The Fate of the Self: German Writers and French Theory (Columbia UP, 1986; Duke UP, 1994), Borrowed Lives (SUNY Press, 1991), and Franz Kafka: The Necessity of Form (Cornell UP, 1988).

KURT RUDOLF FISCHER is Honorary Professor in the Institute für Philosophie, University of Vienna. He is the author of Nietzsche und das 20. Jahrhundert, Philosophie aus Wien, and Aufsätze zur Anglo-Ameri- kanischen und Österreichischen Philosophie, and the editor of Öster- reichische Philosophie von Brentano bis Wittgenstein.

JACOB GOLOMB teaches philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and serves as the director of its Center for Austrian Studies. His books include Nietzsche's Enticing Psychology of Power (Hebrew University Magnes Press, 1989), Introduction to Philosophies of Existence (Ministry of Defence Press, 1990), and In Search of Authenticity (Routledge, 1995). Among his edited works is Nietzsche and Jewish Culture (Routledge, 1997). He is coeditor of Nietzsche and Depth Psychology (SUNY Press, 1999). His forthcoming book is Nietzsche in Zion (Cornell UP).

ROBERT C. HOLUB teaches German intellectual, cultural, and literary history in the German Department of the University of California, Berkeley. Among his numerous publications are Reception Theory (Routledge, 1984), Reflections of Realism (Wayne State UP, 1991), Jürgen Habermas (Routledge, 1991), and Crossing Borders (U of Wisconsin Press, 1991).

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