The Modern Art of Dying: A History of Euthanasia in the United States

By Shai J. Lavi | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

THIS STUDY began during my graduate studies in the Jurisprudence and Social Policy Program at the University of California, Berkeley. I would like to thank my teachers, Philippe Nonet, Kristin Luker, Thomas Laqueur, and Gil Eyal, who offered endless support and guidance on this project, from its inception to its completion. More than once, they provided the Ariadne thread that kept me on track. It is said in the Ethics of Our Fathers, “Accept a teacher upon yourself; make a friend for yourself.” In the spirit of this teaching I express special gratitude to my teacher and friend, Philippe Nonet.

The Jurisprudence and Social Policy Program and its faculty created a highly stimulating intellectual environment. I would like to express deep appreciation to Malcolm Feeley, Lauren Edelman, David Lieberman, and Michael Smith. Every academic tribe has its elders. I benefited immensely from the wisdom of two: Sanford H. Kadish and Robert N. Bellah. Every book has its guardian angel. I am grateful to Meir Dan-Cohen for taking on this role.

This journey would have been an extremely lonely one if not for the friends who accompanied me on the way. I enjoyed and benefited immensely from discussing my work with Roger Berkowitz, Mark Antaki, and Karl Shoemaker, who carefully read and commented on numerous drafts of this study. I also benefited greatly from fruitful discussions with Amir Banbaji, Emmanuel Ben-Zaquen, Lawrence Cohen, Marianne Constable, Scott Heil, Barry Hoffman, Marie-Andre Jacob, Tsachi Keren-Paz, Loolwa Khazoom, Eric Klinenberg, and Joshua Price.

The work was completed during my first years at Tel Aviv University, where I joined my close friends and fellow travelers in the years to come: Yishai Blank and Roy Kreitner. I owe much to the continuous encouragement and advice of my colleagues at Tel Aviv University: Liora Bilsky, Jose Bruner, Hanoch Dagan, Daniel Friedmann, Sharon Hannes, and Ariel Porat. I offer deep gratitude to Menachem Mautner, who encouraged me to study abroad and who supported my work throughout. Finally, I wish to thank with no words and with more than words can convey Shy Abady, Sara Chinsky, and Hamutal Tsamir.

“Where there is no flour there is no Torah.” I am grateful for the financial support I received as a Fulbright Scholar from the Fulbright Fund and the

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