Kingdom of Children: Culture and Controversy in the Homeschooling Movement

By Mitchell L. Stevens | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1. This way of metaphorizing precocious social actors is hardly my own. See, e.g., Howard S. Becker, Outsiders: Studies in the Sociology of Deviance (New York: Free Press, 1963), chap. 8; Paul DiMaggio, “Interest and Agency in Institutional Theory,” in Institutional Patterns and Organizations: Culture and Environment, ed. Lynne G. Zucker (Cambridge, Mass.: Ballinger, 1988), 4–21.

2. Scholars are just now beginning to understand how the 1960s affected biographies on the conservative right as well as the liberal left. See, e.g., Rebecca E. Klatch, A Generation Divided: The New Left, the New Right, and the 1960s (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999); Maurice Isserman and Michael Kazin, America Divided: The Civil War of the 1960s (New York: Oxford University Press, 2000).

3. Elisabeth S. Clemens, “Organizational Form as Frame: Collective Identity and Political Strategy in the American Labor Movement, 1880–1920,” in Comparative Perspectives on Social Movements, ed. Doug McAdam, John D. McCarthy, and Mayer N. Zald (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996), 205–26.


CHAPTER ONE
Inside Home Education

1. For a broad summary of the institutional position of education in modern life, see John W. Meyer, “The Effects of Education as an Institution,” American Journal of Sociology 83 (July 1977): 55–77.

2. Patricia M. Lines, Homeschoolers: Estimating Numbers and Growth (Washington, D.C.: National Institute on Student Achievement, Curriculum, and Assessment, Office of Education Research and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education, spring 1998).

3. Home Education across the United States (Purcellville, Va.: Home School Legal Defense Association, 1997), 2–3.

4. Estimate of the number of charter school students is from Bruno V. Manno, Chester E. Finn Jr., and Gregg Vanourek, “Beyond the Schoolhouse Door: How Charter Schools Are Transforming U.S. Public Education,” Phi Delta Kappan 81 (June 2000): 736–44. See also Chester E. Finn Jr., Bruno V. Manno and Gregg Vanourek, Charter Schools in Action: Renewing Public Education (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2000); Amy Stuart Wells, Alejandra Lopez, Janelle Scott, and Jennifer Jellison Holme, “Charter Schools as Postmodern Paradox: Rethinking Social Stratification in an Age of Deregulated School Choice,” Harvard Educational Review 69 (summer 1999): 172–204; Joe Nathan, Charter Schools:

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Kingdom of Children: Culture and Controversy in the Homeschooling Movement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 3
  • Chapter One - Inside Home Education 10
  • Chapter Two - From Parents to Teachers 30
  • Chapter Three - Natural Mothers, Godly Women 72
  • Chapter Four - Authority and Diversity 107
  • Chapter Five - Politics 143
  • Chapter Six - Nurturing the Expanded Self 178
  • Notes 199
  • Index 225
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