Girlfighting: Betrayal and Rejection among Girls

By Lyn Mikel Brown | Go to book overview

6
From Girlfighting to Sisterhood

She may be an angel who spends all winter,
bringing the homeless blankets and dinner,
a regular Nobel Peace Prize Winner.

But I really hate her,
I'll think of a reason later

….

Inside her head may lay all the answers,
for curing diseases from baldness to cancer.

Salt of the earth and a real good dancer.

But I really hate her,
I'll think of a reason later.

—“I'll Think of a Reason Later,” country song

An eye for an eye leads only to more blindness.

—Margaret Atwood, Cat's Eye

IT'S FOUR O'CLOCK on a winter afternoon and I'm sitting in a small conference room talking about girlfighting with three women—an engineer, an activist, and a businesswoman. We have settled around a square table, one woman per side; the sunlight, weak on this frigidly cold January day, provides barely enough light for the geraniums that line the windowsills. They are blooming nonetheless; in ragtag fashion, clusters of red and pink shamelessly compete for the last long rays. Denise, the engineer—tall, slender, intense—is talking about her childhood, the pivotal moment in second grade when her girlfriends dumped her and she knew for certain what she'd suspected all along, that girls didn't play fair and were not worth the effort.

-175-

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Girlfighting: Betrayal and Rejection among Girls
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction - Bad Girls, Bad Girls, Whatcha Gonna Do? 1
  • 1: Reading the Culture of Girlfighting 11
  • 2: Good Girls and Real Boys 36
  • 3: Playing It like a Girl 67
  • 4: Dancing Through the Minefield 99
  • 5: Patrolling the Borders 135
  • 6: From Girlfighting to Sisterhood 175
  • 7: This Book is an Action 199
  • Appendix 229
  • Notes 233
  • References 243
  • Index 255
  • About the Author 259
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