Girlfighting: Betrayal and Rejection among Girls

By Lyn Mikel Brown | Go to book overview

Index
Adams, Natalie, 3, 181, 225, 227–228
Adolescence, 136; developmental strengths of, 206
Aggression: alternative, 16, 211, 217, 220; biological vs. social explanations, 2–3; as a boys' issue, 13, 200; consequences of in girls, 183; direct, 167; indirect, 79, 126, 166; physical, 16, 111, 112, 114, 157, 169, 214; and power, 6; psychological impact of, 8; rise in girls, 7; social and political impact of, 9; in the workplace, 5. See also Relational aggression
Anger, 6; cultural responses to, 48–51; as opportunity, 207, 216; and race, 197; as response to objectification, 207; suppression of, 73, 200
Apter, Terri, 77
Arendt, Hannah, 128, 132, 185, 189, 193–194
Attitude, 169–171
Atwood, Margaret, 36, 67, 175, 182, 204
Backstabbing, 13–14, 150
Barker, Sharon, 212
Beauty: changing definition of, 27; and race, 72, resistance to ideals of, 221
Belenky, Mary, 190
Betrayal, 76, 147, 176–178, 215
Bettis, Pam, 3, 225
“Bitch”: appropriation of, 127; cultural meaning of, 124–128, 203, 213
Body image, 26, 27, 120, 161, 208
Bond, Lynn, 190
Bordo, Susan, 123
Boyfriends: competition over, 138, 144–145; and neglecting girlfriends, 140, 145
Bossiness, 42, 54, 57–58, 64, 66, 124
Boys: competition over, 29, 96, 113, 147; desire to understand, 46; as friends, 46–47, 120, 128–131, 152–153, 226; girls' perceptions of, 40, 74, 151; preferential treatment of, 155
Bragging, 87, 92
Bullying: in boys, 13, 214; popular constructions of in girls, 13–15; in school, 199–200
Carbonella-Medina, Doris, 197
Chesler, Phyllis, 9, 192, 199, 201–202
Chesney-Lind, Meda, 214–215
Childhood: developmental strengths of, 206; early, 37–38; examples of friendship during, 60–66; late, 86, 104
Chödrön, Pema, 202
Class, socioeconomic: and femininity, 108–109, 212; and girls' development, 4, 6; and media representations, 17, 25. See also Femininity, conventions of
Cliques: emergence of, 88; examples of, 155; protective nature of, 94, 103; on television, 23
Coalition-building, 224. See also Resistance, possibilities for
Community, 191
Compulsory heterosexuality, 96, 130; media representations of, 19–21
Critical capital, 190
Cultural capital, definition of, 208
Dads and Daughters organization, 221
de Beauvoir, Simone, 19, 222
Debold, Elizabeth, 30
Deceit, 5, 14, 21
Delpit, Lisa, 208
Diamond, Lisa, 141
Dines, Gail, 193
Discourse: double voiced, 47–50; pleasing women's, 28
Diversity Coalition, 224–225
Domination, internalized, 197; definition of, 206

-255-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Girlfighting: Betrayal and Rejection among Girls
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction - Bad Girls, Bad Girls, Whatcha Gonna Do? 1
  • 1: Reading the Culture of Girlfighting 11
  • 2: Good Girls and Real Boys 36
  • 3: Playing It like a Girl 67
  • 4: Dancing Through the Minefield 99
  • 5: Patrolling the Borders 135
  • 6: From Girlfighting to Sisterhood 175
  • 7: This Book is an Action 199
  • Appendix 229
  • Notes 233
  • References 243
  • Index 255
  • About the Author 259
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 259

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.