Gun Crusaders: The NRA's Culture War

By Scott Melzer | Go to book overview

7

Right and Far-Right Moral Politics

NRA Critical Mass member Bob and Reserve member Frank are differently committed not only to the organization and gun rights but also to conservatism. Bob is a highly committed member of a quarter century who donates money to and volunteers for the NRA. Frank is a moderately committed member who has attended NRA fundraising dinners on a couple of occasions but describes himself as not a very active member. There are also distinguishable differences in their politics, yet both are NRA members and conservatives. Bob and Frank generally hold different views on contentious political issues such as terrorism, racial profiling, same-sex marriage, and taxes. At times, however, their views converge, reflecting their shared status as conservatives. Overall, highly committed Critical Mass member Bob leans much further to the Right than Frank.

Talking terrorism and racial profiling, Bob thinks it is “perfectly appropriate” to question a Middle Eastern man instead of a “little old lady” before they get on a plane. We have used racial profiling before he argues, citing Japanese internment camps during World War II, which he describes as “perfectly just.” Frank also sees racial profiling as useful in fighting crime.

Bob is also highly conservative on gender and sexuality issues. He supports restrictions on women's jobs in the military and applauds the military's “Don't Ask, Don't Tell” policy, preventing openly gay individuals from serving. He is displeased with the changes to gender arrangements brought on by World War II and feminism, arguing that these are “detrimental” to society and families. He also finds fault with same-sex marriage and same sex-couples adopting children, and worries about the negative effects these may have. Bob expresses his strong support for constitutional rights and allowing everyone (including gays and lesbians) to do as they please in the same conversation where he derisively refers to gay adoption as a form of “indoctrination.” Frank shares similar views regarding

-198-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gun Crusaders: The NRA's Culture War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Defending Guns, Defending Masculinity 23
  • 1: Frontier Masculinity, America's Gun Culture, and the NRA 25
  • 2: Why a Gun Movement? 44
  • Part II - Talking Guns, Talking Culture War 71
  • 3: Framing Threats to Gun Rights 73
  • 4: Under Attack 110
  • 5: Fighting the Culture Wars 131
  • Part III - Committing to the NRA, Committing to the Right 169
  • 6: The Politics of Commitment 171
  • 7: Right and Far-Right Moral Politics 198
  • 8: The Ties That Bind 224
  • Epilogue - Tomorrow's NRA 247
  • Appendix - Studying the NRA 257
  • Notes 271
  • Index 305
  • About the Author 323
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 323

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.