Race, Ethnicity, and Policing: New and Essential Readings

By Stephen K. Rice; Michael D. White Roberts | Go to book overview

Introduction to Part III

Michael D. White

The primary objective of this section is to immerse the reader in the state-of-the-art research on race/ethnicity, bias, and policing. The section includes original contributions from the top experts in the country describing their latest work in this important area. There are three persistent themes in the collection of chapters presented here. The first theme is methodological, as the research clearly demonstrates a need to collect data from multiple sources, and to examine relationships among key variables at multiple levels of analysis. Chapters by Warren and colleagues, Engel and colleagues, Parker and colleagues, and White and Saunders, in particular, capture this theme. The second theme is definitional and relates to the need to expand our conception of race/ethnicity beyond the traditional black/white dichotomy. Chapters by Fagan and colleagues and Parker and colleagues deal specifically with broadened definitions of race/ethnicity and bias. The third theme involves police behavior itself and addresses the importance of expanding the range of police activities that warrant examination. More specifically, the chapter from Fagan and colleagues expands the study of “traffic” stops to include “stop and frisk” activities by police. Also, after being overshadowed by concerns of profiling in traffic stops, questions over race and police use of force have now reemerged. The classic chapter by Fyfe, and White and Saunders's study of race and TASERs, highlight the importance of this theme. Each of the chapters in this section is described in more detail below.

Warren and colleagues examine the impact of race on the likelihood of being stopped by both the North Carolina Highway Patrol and local police in the state. This study resonates with the methodological theme, as the authors use citizen survey data that allows them to capture a range of contextual variables that often are missing in traffic stop studies—most notably, measures of self-reported driving behavior. Warren and colleagues find that race is a significant predictor of traffic stops in the data involving local police, but not in the Highway Patrol data. They suggest that race may be less important for Highway Patrol because officers in that agency are less likely to do routine patrol work, and because race is often difficult to discern when patrolling highways (i.e., given the speed at which vehicles travel). The authors conclude by suggesting that research should be tailored based on the agency under study, and that future research should also focus on officer decision making after the stop has been made.

-261-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race, Ethnicity, and Policing: New and Essential Readings
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 535

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.