Race, Ethnicity, and Policing: New and Essential Readings

By Stephen K. Rice; Michael D. White Roberts | Go to book overview


About the Contributors

Geoffrey P. Alpert is Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of South Carolina. His books include Managing Accountability Systems for Police Conduct: Internal Affairs and External Oversight (with J. Noble) and Understanding Police Use of Force: Officers, Suspects, and Reciprocity (with R. Dunham), which was recently published by Cambridge University Press.

Rod K. Brunson is Associate Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.

Garth Davies is Assistant Professor in the School of Criminology at Simon Fraser University. He is the author of Crime, Neighborhood, and Public Housing (LFB Scholarly Publishing, 2006).

Robin S. Engel is Associate Professor in the Division of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati and Director of the University of Cincinnati Policing Institute.

Jeffrey A. Fagan is Professor of Law and Public Health and Director of the Center for Crime, Community, and Law at Columbia University. He is author (with Frank Zimring) of Changing Borders of Juvenile Justice (University of Chicago Press, 2000) and editor (with several others) of Legitimacy and Criminal Justice in Comparative Perspective (2008, Russell Sage Foundation Press).

The late James J. Fyfe was Distinguished Professor of Law, Police Science, and Criminal Justice Administration at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and Deputy Commissioner of Training with the New York City Police Department at the time of his death in 2005. Fyfe coauthored Above the Law (with Jerome H. Skolnick, 1993) and the most recent edition of O. W. Wilson's classic Police Administration (with Jack Greene and William Walsh, 1996).

Amanda Geller is Associate Research Scientist at Columbia University.

Bernard E. Harcourt is the Julius Kreeger Professor of Law and Criminology and Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Against Prediction: Profiling, Policing, and Punishing in an Actuarial Age (University of Chicago Press, 2007), Language of the Gun: Youth, Crime, and Public Policy (University of Chicago Press 2005), and Illusion of Order: The False Promise of Broken Windows Policing (Harvard University Press, 2001).

David A. Harris is Professor of Law at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. He is the author of Good Cops: The Case for Preventive Policing (The New Press,

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