Sells like Teen Spirit: Music, Youth Culture, and Social Crisis

By Ryan Moore | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book has been a long, long time in the making, sort of like my own version of Chinese Democracy (I can only hope it gets better reviews!). When I began doing ethnographic research in the San Diego scene way back in 1995, I had the good fortune to be shown the ropes by a number of musicians and all-around hipsters, particularly Rob Crow, Julie D., Brock Gallard, Dale Harris, Gary Hustwit, Hugh Kim, Aaron Mancini, Patrick Padilla, Armistead Burwell Smith IV, Jenny Stewart, Stimy, Mark Waters, and Mitch Wilson. Bob Beyerle, Larry Harmon, and John Lee not only granted me extensive, candid interviews but also lent me zines and photographs that were indispensable for my research. Tim Mays and everyone else at the Casbah furnished a second home during my grad school years, and their cooperation was essential. Paul O'Beirne and Pete Reichert not only caused me to rock out on countless occasions while they were playing with Rocket From the Crypt but also poured a good pint and talked a lot of shit as bartenders at the Live Wire. Last but certainly not least, from the beginning Matt Reese served as my guide through this scene and its history, granting colorful, humorous, and thoughtful interviews and also allowing me to rummage through a lifelong collection of old punk zines, photographs, and flyers.

In graduate school at UC San Diego, I was incredibly fortunate to find a community with whom I could debate ideas, grade papers, and party (though not necessarily all at the same time!). We also walked picket lines together, and some of them served with me on the UC Strike Committee while we waged an eventually victorious struggle to unionize academic student employees at the University of California. So, in the outdated parlance of the 1990s, I would like to “raise the roof” for my posse of Kelly Becker, Eric Boime, Krista Camenzind, Kathleen Casey, Mark Collier, Abbie Cory, Rod Ferguson, Susan Fitzpatrick-Behrens, Rene Hayden, Rafiki Jenkins, Beth Jennings, Christina Jimenez, Dan Johnston, Melisa Klimaszewski, Tom Lide, Adam Linsen, Alberto Loza, Kelly Mayhew,

-vii-

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Sells like Teen Spirit: Music, Youth Culture, and Social Crisis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1: Anarchy in the Usa 1
  • 2: Reagan Youth 33
  • 3: Hell Awaits 75
  • 4: Young, Gifted, and Slack 114
  • 5: Retro Punks and Pin-Up Girls 156
  • 6: The Work of Rock in the Age of Digital Reproduction 197
  • Notes 219
  • Bibliography 245
  • Index 265
  • About the Author 275
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