Sells like Teen Spirit: Music, Youth Culture, and Social Crisis

By Ryan Moore | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1

1. Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2007), p. 7.

2. Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain, Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk (New York: Penguin Books, 1996), p. 204.

3. Hell has repeatedly insisted that “Blank Generation” was not a nihilistic song. Instead, he intended the “blank” to refer to the sense of possibility arising from a lack of definition. In the social context of the 1970s, however, the “blank” was more commonly interpreted as an anthemic reference to the vacancy and inanity of posthippie youth. Following that understanding, the Sex Pistols' “Pretty Vacant” was meant to be an English equivalent of “Blank Generation.”

4. McNeil and McCain, Please Kill Me; Jon Savage, England's Dreaming: Anarchy, Sex Pistols, Punk Rock, and Beyond (New York: St. Martin's Griffin, 1993); Clinton Heylin, Babylon's Burning: From Punk to Grunge (New York: Canongate, 2007).

5. William Tabb, The Long Default: New York City and the Urban Fiscal Crisis (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1982); Joshua B. Freeman, Working-Class New York: Life and Labor Since World War II (New York: New Press, 2000), ch. 15.

6. Klein, The Shock Doctrine.

7. Quoted in Tabb, The Long Default, p. 28. Simon later served as president of the John M. Olin Foundation, a conservative think tank that would play a key role in shifting American political discourse to the right, particularly on economic issues. In one of his books, Simon wrote, “The capitalist miracle occurred in the United States, the politically freest nation in the world, precisely because this explosion of wealth is uniquely a result of individual liberty. That is the true defense of capitalism. That is what most people do not understand—and that is what deserves to be shouted from the rooftops” (William Simon, A Time for Truth [New York: Reader's Digest Press, 1978], p. 25, italics in original).

8. Freeman, Working-Class New York, p. 256.

9. Jeff Chang, Can't Stop, Won't Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2005), pp. 10–17; Tricia Rose, Black Noise: Rap

-219-

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Sells like Teen Spirit: Music, Youth Culture, and Social Crisis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1: Anarchy in the Usa 1
  • 2: Reagan Youth 33
  • 3: Hell Awaits 75
  • 4: Young, Gifted, and Slack 114
  • 5: Retro Punks and Pin-Up Girls 156
  • 6: The Work of Rock in the Age of Digital Reproduction 197
  • Notes 219
  • Bibliography 245
  • Index 265
  • About the Author 275
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