Racial Justice in the Age of Obama

By Roy L. Brooks | Go to book overview

INDEX
abolitionism, xix
abortion, 23
ACCION INTERNATIONAL, 120
“activist” policing, 23
ad hoc political nationalism, 83, 84, 86
Adarand Constructors, Inc. v. Peña, 184n11, 200n35
Adjusted Compensation Act (1924), 121
“adopt-a-family” programs, 56, 85
affirmative action: antidiscrimination principle, 8; for Asians for education, 208n79; case law, 184n11; class-based, 49–50, 59, 197n113; college enrollment action and, 126; critical race theorists on, xix; effect on education, 18; effect on statistics, 126; Ely on, 13; occupational status and, 126; race-based, 49–50, 59, 114; realists on, 101; reformism on, xvii, 48, 49–50, 57, 59; as reverse discrimination, 13; Sowell on, 30; Steele on, 19, 30; Thomas on, 17–18, 30; traditionalism on, 17–19, 28; West on, 49–50, 59; for whites, 6
African American Academy (Seattle), 72
The African American Book of Values (Barboza, ed.), 63
Afro-American, use of term, 9
Age of Obama: nature of race problem in, 10–13; racial landscape in, x-xiii
Airaskorpi, Ossi, 116
Akeelah and the Bee (film), 79
Ali, Ayaan Hirsi, 14, 188n1
aliens, civil rights of, 4, 5
Alito, Sam, ix
An American Dilemma (Myrdal), xi
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), 7
Amish people, 78
angry defiance, 61, 62
anti-objective society, xix
antidiscrimination principle, 8–9
antiessentialism, 106
antiobjectivity of critical race theory, 93
antiracist organizations, coalition of, 56
Anup Engquist v. Oregon Department of Agriculture, 184n7
Ash v. Tyson Foods, Inc., 188n55
Ashe, Arthur, 40
Asia, education in, 117
Asians and Pacific Islanders: affirmative action for education, 208n79; business ownership statistics for, 153f; disparate resource statistics for, 12–13, 129f–82f, 184n1, 188n56; education statistics for, 154f–59f; family structure statistics for, 163f–67f; hate crimes statistics for, 176f–78f; home ownership statistical disparity for, 126–27, 152f, 188n56; incarceration rates for, 172f–73f; income statistics for, 129f–36f, 140f–51f; occupational status of, 160f–62f; as “people of color,” 106; post–civil rights problem, 109; poverty statistics for, 129f–36f; racial profiling in traffic stops, 175f; unemployment statistics for, 168f–71f; voting statistics for, 179f–82f
asset poverty, 46
authentic blackness, 55
backstage racism, 38, 41–42, 48, 57
Bakke case, 126, 184n11
balkanization, 81–82
BALSA, 76, 77
Barboza, Steven, 63
Barrett, Paul, 35, 39–40
Batson v. Kentucky, 194n36
Baynes, Leonard, 45–46
Bell, Derrick: on equality, 94; on racial progress, 102; on racial realism, 206n40; on school integration, 68; on white self–interest, 97–98, 99
benign discrimination, 18, 49
BFSQ. See bona fide selection qualification
black businesses: black churches for microloans, 75; developing financial capital resources in, 119; financial assistance to, 71, 75; microlending for, xx, 75, 115, 119, 120
black church, 79; Black Liberation Theology, 64–65, 79; as source of financial assistance to black businesses, 75
black communities: black-mainstream communities, 63–64; Brooks on, 114; developing capital resources in black businesses, 119; exodus of middle class to white communities, 75, 77
black experience, x–xiii

-225-

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Racial Justice in the Age of Obama
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Traditionalism 14
  • Chapter 3 - Reformism 35
  • Chapter 4 - Limited Separation 63
  • Chapter 5 - Critical Race Theory 89
  • Epilogue: Toward the “best” Post–civil Rights Theory 109
  • Appendix Disparate Resources in America by Race in the Post–civil Rights Era 125
  • Notes 183
  • Bibliography 211
  • Index 225
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