Lincoln on Race and Slavery

By Henry Louis Gates Jr.; Donald Yacovone et al. | Go to book overview

27

First Debate With Stephen A. Douglas At Ottawa, Illinois:
CW, 3:14–18, 27–30

On July 24, 1858, Abraham Lincoln challenged Stephen A. Douglas to a series of debates. Douglas reluctantly accepted and insisted that they appear in each of the state's nine congressional districts—excepting Chicago and Springfield, where each candidate recently had delivered speeches. Douglas also named the towns for each event, and by July 31 the two had settled on the format. The first debate took place in the small north-central Illinois town of Ottawa, attended by a crowd of several thousand people. The historic debates, focusing on slavery and race, revisited the positions Lincoln had taken since adoption of the 1854 Kansas-Nebraska Act. By 1858, however, civil war in Kansas and especially the 1857 Dred Scott decision had changed the political landscape. Lincoln always condemned slavery as a “monstrous injustice,” but he insisted that only by adhering to the intentions of the Founding Fathers could the nation preserve democracy and safely rid itself of slavery and the unwanted slave. Lincoln singled out the 1820 Compromise as necessary to recognize the interests of slaveholders and the Fathers' intention of placing slavery on the road to extinction. Douglas's policies, Lincoln asserted, abandoned the legacy of the Founders. With a conciliatory tone, he carefully avoided holding Southerners responsible for the existence of slavery and reaffirmed his preference for emancipation and black resettlement in Liberia. He shared Douglas's popular racial attitudes: “There is a physical difference between the two, which in my judgment will probably forever forbid their living together upon the footing of perfect equality.” He did not hesitate to refer to blacks as niggers. He also marked out a fundamental difference with his Democratic opponent on the race issue. While Douglas believed that blacks were best kept in slavery, Lincoln insisted that African Americans always had been included in the definition of equality offered by the Declaration of Independence.

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lincoln on Race and Slavery
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 346

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.