Clinical Handbook of Couple Therapy

By Alan S. Gurman; Neil S. Jacobson | Go to book overview

Chapter 4

Structural–Strategic Marital Therapy
JAMES KEIM
JAY LAPPIN

All clinicians must deal with marriages in some way, because everyone is
either married, planning to be married, or avoiding marriage.

—JAY HALEY (1976, p. 161)

No two models are more closely associated with the evolution of family therapy than structural and strategic therapy. In their early years, these two therapy models evolved as synergistic dancers on the newly opened stage of systems therapy. Over the last 30 years, their evolution has paralleled many of the advances and missteps of the family therapy field.This chapter on structural–strategic therapy (SST) for marital problems attempts to capture the most current range of practice of the Washington school of strategic therapy,1 founded by Jay Haley and Cloe Madanes, and the structural school, founded by Salvador Minuchin, Braulio Montalvo, and associates.2 We, as long-time proponents of their respective models,3 proceed from the following basic viewpoints.
BASIC VIEWPOINTS

Basic Descriptive Assumptions
1. The structural model and the Washington school of strategic therapy are described as existing within a single range of practice rather than as separate models. As employed in this chapter, the term “SST” refers not to a new model of therapy, but rather to this range of practice represented by current structural and Washington school clinical practice. Because SST represents a range of practice rather than a single style, differences are noted without contradicting the single model construct. This definition is similar to that of describing different shades of the color blue; for many purposes, a range of hues may still be best thought of as being different shades of a single color, blue. This approach is informed by the work of Stanton and Todd (Stanton, 1981; Stanton, Todd, & Associates, 1982), Andolfi (1979), and Friesen (1985), as well as by the 1993 conference “The Integration of Structural and Strategic Therapy,” held at the National Institutes of Health, and by the works of other major figures in SST.4
2. Borrowing from Aponte's and DiCesare's (2000, p. 46) description of structural therapy, we note that SST is “not another insulated, self-contained model of therapy. It has become an approach that contributes a perspective to other models, and can comfortably utilize contributions from them.” Both the structural and strategic teaching and supervision traditions have used not only their own constructs, but also those of other models, in order

-86-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Clinical Handbook of Couple Therapy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 732

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.