CHAPTER 7

Everyday Youth Music Cultures and Media

I will now succinctly tie together previous theoretical propositions and empirical analyses that have attempted to understand how music interacts with young people's everyday lives. These empirically informed theoretical propositions are to be applied throughout to the five aims outlined in the introduction. The three sections of this chapter will address these aims collectively so as to show how the book as a whole has been underpinned by a consistent and sustained research agenda. First, I will propose a situational interactionist model for the study of everyday youth music cultures and media. This model will not only address the initial aim of this study–to analyse the literature on subcultures, club cultures and postsubcultures from an interactionist perspective–but will also be informed by ideas and findings that have attempted to address other aims, such as to respectively situate and contextualise local youth music practices (both mediated and co-present) in relation to other leisure, education and work activities. Similarly, the second and third sections of this chapter draw on distinct ideas and findings but attempt to apply them across each of the five aims. As such, notions of intergenerational narratives as well as localised performances are shown to be consistent with the theoretical model of situational interactionism as earlier advocated.


A situational interactionist model

The model outlined here contains features that will be compared with those that have hindered a structuralist or postmodernist framework for understanding music in young people's everyday lives. The first feature of this situational interactionist model is its central focus on the local, familial and traditional contexts for everyday youth music cultures. A second feature is this model's conceptualisation of youth music practices as the consequences of learning to follow certain rules of enactment (Schatzki 1996) or

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