Social Justice: Theories, Issues, and Movements

By Loretta Capeheart; Dragan Milovanovic | Go to book overview

NOTES

PREFACE

1. Other universities with programs or departments with Justice Studies as titles or part of titles include Kent State University, Methodist College, San Jose State University, University of San Francisco, University of Thomas, Goshen College, and University of Idaho. The list grows as more departments change their names from criminal justice to Justice Studies.

2. The Northeastern Illinois University Catalogue includes a description of the Justice Studies Program:

In Justice Studies we seek to discover the social and historical roots of jus-
tice and injustice and examine how popular understandings of these shape
public policies, including those of the criminal justice system. We study sys-
tematic explanations for the failure (or triumph) of justice in society and
explore the potential for transformative justice. Through critical inquiry,
social science investigation, and experiential learning, students develop an
understanding of social and economic justice issues and critical criminology.
We study the structural roots of crime and take up the legal and social
concerns of socially disenfranchised communities whose members are often
clients of the criminal justice system, including the poor, people of color,
women, prisoners, and refugees. The program makes a special effort to involve
and serve community groups. Field experience, focusing on advocacy for
community justice and the ethics that inform those practices, complements
the academic program.

The School of Justice and Social Inquiry at Arizona State University includes the following “mission statement”:

We are interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary, with a tradition of strong ties
with other units in the social sciences and humanities. The School has three
broad foci:
Economic Justice—particularly the global dimension of changing eco-
nomic relations.
Social Justice, Law and Policy—focusing on crime, environment,
immigration, welfare, health, and other policies that inspire justice
concerns, especially around race, class, and gender.
Cultural Transformation and Justice—especially the role of the media
and new technologies in changing perspectives on justice.

… Our students develop an understanding of the meanings of justice
and injustice from a comparative, historical, and global context and learn to
analyze issues through critical inquiry and social science investigation. We

-205-

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