Women Embracing Islam: Gender and Conversion in the West

By Karin Van Nieuwkerk | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1
The Quest for Peace in Submission
Reflections on the Journey of American Women Converts to Islam

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad

In the aftermath of the attacks on New York and Washington on September 11, 2001, the United States government declared a war on terrorism: on alQaeda for carrying out the attacks and on the Taliban for harboring terrorists. The war was justified as a defense against those who have chosen to be the enemies of American values and civilization, of democracy and freedom. At the same time, the war propaganda focused on the Taliban's mistreatment of women and cast the war effort as a means of liberating and empowering the oppressed women of Afghanistan. The noble goal of championing democracy and confronting Muslim societies deemed as mistreating their women harked back to the founding of the American Republic two centuries earlier. The Founding Fathers of the United States declared their first foreign war against the Barbary States, a war justified as targeting despotism and fostering an attitude of civility toward Muslim women. Islam and Muslims were cast as the “Other,” the counterimage of what it means to be American.

The immediate response to the shock of the September attacks was the question posed by the media: “Why? Why do they hate us?” and the consequent attempt by the American public to learn more about the religion of Islam. As Qur'ans and books about Islam disappeared from bookstores, and Christians and Jews visited mosques and invited Muslims to explain the teachings of Islam, Muslims were awed by the number of people who were being exposed to the teachings of their faith. One leader is reported to have said, “Not even a billion dollars to support da'wa [propagation] would have made it possible to reach as many Americans with the message of Islam.”1 A few leaders have cited this fact as an assurance that God moves in mysterious ways, that he has not abandoned the Muslims but rather is testing them. And in the aftermath of 9/11 there were several reports that there was a palpable growth in the number of converts to Islam, especially among women,2 leading some Muslims overseas to believe that there is a massive tide of conversion taking place. Despite the media focus on “the oppression” of Muslim women and the violence inherent in Islam, the process of conversion of

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women Embracing Islam: Gender and Conversion in the West
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.