The Supreme Court and Election Law: Judging Equality from Baker v. Carr to Bush v. Gore

By Richard L. Hasen | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book is much stronger thanks to the insightful and challenging comments of many colleagues. Bruce Cain, Beth Garrett, Heather Gerken, Tom Mann, Chris May, Rick Pildes, Bob Pushaw, Roy Schotland, and Mark Tushnet had the patience to read and comment on the entire manuscript. I also received useful comments and suggestions from Ellen Aprill, Evan Caminker, Del Dickson, Sam Issacharoff, Pam Korland, Hal Krent, Dan Lowenstein, Michael McConnell, Dan Ortiz, Spencer Overton, Josh Rosenkranz, Peter Schuck, David Strauss, Stephen Wermiel, Richard Winker, Adam Winkler, and participants at a Loyola Law School faculty workshop.

I could not have written a book such as this without the support of Loyola Law School, particularly Dean David Burcham and Associate Dean Victor Gold. They made sure that whatever resources I needed to conduct my research were available, and, more importantly, they have created the environment for scholars and teachers to thrive.

Thanks also to Robert Nissenbaum, Paul Howard, and Renee Rastorfer of Loyola's law library for stellar support. Indeed, this book could not have been written without the support of research librarians. Much of the historical research conducted for this book relied upon the case files of Supreme Court justices. I am grateful to Del Dickson for helping me get started tracking down these materials. Jeff Flannery of the Library of Congress Manuscript Reading Room went above and beyond the call of duty in assisting me in examining the papers of Chief Justice Warren and Justices Brennan, Douglas, and Marshall. John Jacob, archivist of Justice Powell's papers at Washington and Lee University, was also generous with his time, as was Mike Widener of the University of Texas Law Library (Justice Clark's papers) and Nancy Shader of Princeton's Seely G. Mudd Manuscript Library (Justice Harlan's papers). Thanks also to the executors of

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